Friday, July 22, 2016

Acoustic Communication Studies (U) An experimental study of techniques for Submarine to Submarine Communication System. Contract Number N00014-73-C-0593 Technical Report July 1971 June 1974 Report Date September 1975

#WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield @ridgefield  in #FairfieldCounty #CT  Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut wanted to share Some 42 years later I can now see and read some of my own father’s work. This took about 3 years from my first FOIA request 13-F-1279 On 20 August 2013 after spotting my father's work Kimball C.V. Acoustic Communication Studies on a online Journal of Defense Research Cumulative Index, 1969-1978. 


Then to ONR FOIA 16-061 received scanned pdf on July 20th 2016

Though I was a young boy at the time while we had lived in Miami, Florida from 1971-1979. Here is a piece of his work called 
Acoustic Communication Studies (U) An experimental study of techniques for Submarine to Submarine Communications Systems. 
Contract Number N00014-73-C-0593 Technical Report July 1971 June 1974  Report Date September 1975 ARPA Advanced Research Projects Agency Office Of Naval Research Code 222. Supplementary Notes: To be published in the Journal Of Defense Research Series B Tactical Warfare, September 1975 Performing Organization Ocean Engineering Division RSMAS Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science University Of Miami UM-RSMAS 75034 Palisades Geophysical Institute Miami Florida

By this above Table 1. Summary of fixed-site communications experiments. You can tell by Experiment M1 and appears year is 1968 my father had started working on this when still at Cooley Electronics Laboratory University of Michigan. The above in table finished with the Experiment M6C year 1973


The little guy in the crib is Thomas Q Kimball WA8UNS

My father was in Signal Officer Basic Course, Ft Gordon June through August 1969 but came back to Ann Arbor, Michigan to see my birth July 4th 1969. At the The University of Michigan Hospital  Ann Arbor, Michigan. From 1969 until 1971 my father had to do his Army two-year active duty US Army Signal Corps Officer with the US Army Security Agency Support Group out of Ft Meade, Md. We had a TDY at Ft Hood, TX  December 1969 through May 1970 for MASSTER US Army Project Mobile Army Sensor System Test Evaluation and Review Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Night Observation STANO. National Security Agency NSA R Group - Research and Engineering 1970-1971 after that in 1971 we would move to Miami, Florida. 



Thomas with his father somewhere in the Florida Everglades  Circa 1970’s after 1971.

My father who was WB4WZR in Miami then 1971-1979 And WA8UNS from 1966-1971
 Where it all started 69-71 Call sign WA8UNS at our home in Bowie, Md United States  Notice the HF Antenna in the back ground. 


Thomas Q Kimball WA8UNS from Ridgefield, Connecticut and my father Operating Special Station February 4th - 6th 2013

Father and son Operating Amateur Radio Ham Radio at AMC Appalachian Mountain Club Northwest Camp. northwest slope of Bear Mountain in Salisbury, CT.  My Mom did the role of professional Photographer. Thanks :)

I have taken time to re-write some of my father’s work below are samples and or parts of his work. Please note some of the mathematics might be off in my re-write as some of it hard to see. The complete work can be found here: http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADC003594 so it would be picked up by search engines such as google. I am sharing his work for educational purposes.




An experiment study of coherent, matched filter techniques for  submarine-to-submarine communication was conducted, matched filter techniques offer three advantages over existing systems. First, coherent integration allows useful system operation at signal-to-noise ratios significantly below 0 db. Incoherent systems experience a threshold at a 0 db signal-to-noise ratio, which causes system performance to deteriorate rapidly. Second, filtering of the received information symbol with a filter matched to the received symbol waveform reduces the effects of both noise and multipath. Finally, these techniques are compatible with a wideband, randomized transmission format, which reduces the detectability of the signal by unintended receivers. The research program was conducted in two stages. The first stage evaluated communication system performance over 7- and 42- nmi fixed-site ranges. Over 4,000 hours of experimental data were obtained and analyzed to ensure the statistical significance of the measurements. Results from these data showed that reliable communication could be obtained with signal-to-noise ratios below 0 db. A typical experimental system (M6B) transmitted 0.625 bit/sec in a 100-hz band centered on 420 hz. Over a 42-nmi patch this system yielded a bit error probability of 0.01 at an input signal-to-noise ratio of -9 db. Such performance is within 6 db of that obtainable with the optimum receiver operating though a linear time invariant channel with added white Gaussian noise. To determine the applicability of the fixed-site results to the submarine-to-submarine communication problem the second stage of the program investigated the space-time stability of the acoustic medium with a towed source. An experiment was conducted in the deep ocean off Eleuthera, B.I at ranges from 0 to 400 nmi. This experiment indicated only a 10 percent decorrelation  in the channel from one 30-sec interval to the next. Consequently the coherent, matched filter techniques evaluated over the fixed-site ranges are applicable to practical problems involving moving platforms. Based on the results of the experimental program development of a practical submarine-to-submarine communication system using coherent matched filter techniques is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) incorporating a randomized burst-type transmission for detection resistance is suggested as a basis for future work. 

1 Introduction:
Underwater acoustic communications systems based on coherent matched filter techniques have been studied coherent matched filter techniques have been studied experimentally. Although the specific goal of the research was tactical submarine to submarine communications systems, the results are applicable to other situations. This paper describes extensive fixed-site communication experiments and an important transmission measurements that encourage the immediate consideration of these techniques for submarine communication systems. 

Coherent, matched-filter techniques offer three distinct advantages for submarine communication systems. First coherent integration allows satisfactory operation at low signal-to-noise ratios without the threshold effect that is common to incoherent systems. Second, matched-filter operation reduces the effects of both noise and multipath under varying propagation conditions. And finally these techniques are compatible with a randomized transmission format that reduces the detectability of the communication signal. 

The processing techniques employed in the research are based on well established theory. The acoustic medium is measured to approximate a linear, time-invariant channel with added white Gaussian noise. For such a channel, the optimum receiver is composed of a filter matched to the received signal, following by the threshold device.The matched filter can also be shown to reduce intersymbol interference caused by multipath.

Because the physical channel is distinctly time-varying the received symbol waveform must be continually measured to maintain the required match between the filter and the symbol waveform. This measurement is made possibly including a known probe component in the transmission in addition to the unknown information component. Thurs the communication systems described here perform dual roles channel measurement and information transmission. 

The second stage of the experimental program was to determine the applicability if the fixed-site results to the submarine communication problem. For such an application to be possible, the acoustic medium must be stable in space as well as time. That is the probe measurement  of the channel must remain valid under spatial displacement of the submarine platform consequently a careful measurement of the spatial stability was made as described in Section V. 

The union of the results from the fixed-site communication experiments and the spatial-stability measurements solely indicates the feasibility of coherent matched-filter techniques for the submarine communication systems.This conclusions and others are presented in section VI. An application of these techniques in conjunction with a randomized transmission format is also given. 

II. Transmission  Format
Because of the dual nature of the transmission and the implementation of the receiver processing the signals transmitted by the communication systems have a complicated format. One part of the signal the probe component allows measurements of the channel the other the information component contains the information. Subsequent parts of this section describe these components in detail and explain there choose of transmission format. Section III on the receiver processing completes the explanation. The probe and information components are transmitted interleaved  in time (time multiplexed) as described in section IIb

A.  Basic Signal Element The Digit:
Both components of the transmission are composed of a succession of biphase modulated elements called digits The simplest example of a digit waveform is a rectangular carrier pulse.The probe and information components consist of modulated digits in a prescribed (or in the case of the information component almost prescribed) earlier. In the subsequent discussion no conflict will arise if the digit waveform is assumed to be a rectangular carrier pulse although in practice some amount of band spreading of the digit is desirable as suggested below. For a rectangular carrier pulse the pulse duration and bandwidth are inversely related: that is, once the duration is specified, the bandwidth is also fixed.


B. Probe Component
The probe component of the transmission allows the receiver to measure the channel digit response. Because the information symbols are composed of the combinations of the digits, a filter matched to the symbols can be formed from the digit response. The probe component must be constant and known to the receiver if this measurement is to be successful. 


C. Information Component
The information component can be formed in one of three ways: (1) biphase modulation of single transmitted digits: (2) biphase modulation of groups of digits, where the intragroup structure is constant: or (3) variable symbol modulation in which biphase modulation of groups of digits, where the intragroup structure varies from on symbol to the next is carried out. 

In the subsequent discussion, the difference between a digit-described previously-and a symbol is important. A symbol is a digit or groups of digits used to carry a single bit of information. The objective of the receiver is to determine symbol values, not digit values, thus the difference between the two methods of forming the information components lies in the structure of the symbol waveform. 

1. Single Digit Symbols 
The simplest construction of the information component assigns a single digit to each symbol. A digit transmitted at 0 phase represents a binary one; a digit transmitted at 180-deg phase represents a binary-minus one. This technique was used in the M1,M2, M3 and M4 systems. 

2. Multiple Digit Symbols
If each information symbol is composed of only one digit as described above then potential tradeoff opportunities for the system design are eliminated.


3. Variable Symbol Modulation
If more than one digit is contained in each symbol as described above, the opportunity to alter the symbol composition from one time interval to the next arises.

D. Multiplexing of Probe And Information Components
The transmission in each of the matched-filter communication systems consists of a multiplex of the probe and information components. In choosing the multiplexing technique the particular purpose of the probe component must be considered. For example frequency multiplexing would be inappropriate in the acoustic medium because the digit response measured in one frequency band would not be valid in another frequency band. 

III. Receiver Processing
The receiver in the M5 and M6 communication systems performs a dual role. The first part of this dual role is to measure the existing channel digit response from the probe component of the transmission. 




A. Preliminary Processing
Signals from the receiver hydrophone are transmitted though linear, fixed-gained amplifiers to the processor, the gains of these amplifiers being selected so that no clipping occurs during normal operations. 

B. Probe Processing
The primary objective of the probe processing is to determine the channel digit response. A secondary but important , objective of the probe processing is to measure the basic transmission characteristics of the medium to aid in evaluation and understanding of the system performance. 

1. Channel Digit Response Measurements
As mentioned above, the primary objective of the probe processing is to derive the approximate channel digit response p(t) Let p (k,i) be the sampled data representation of p(t) obtained in the kth measurement interval. 


2. Measurement of Signal and Noise Powers
The wideband signal and noise powers, SP and NP are measured to allow evaluation of the system performance.

C. Information Component Processing 
The objective of the information component processing is to make correct decisions on the transmitted symbol values. These decisions can be scored against known answers in the case of a periodic transmission. For demonstration purposes the received values can be printed as characters on a teletype. 

1. Matched-Filter Operation
The first step in the processing of the kth information component is to form a coherent average a,(k,i) of the information component:

2. Decision Process
To determine the symbol values a zero threshold is applied to the symbol matched-filter outputs L(k,i).

3. Scoring of Receiver Decisions
To evaluate the system error performance the receiver decisions d(i) are scored against know correct values. This can be done as long as the symbol values in the information component are known as they are in the case of periodic transmission.

D. Synchronization
In the preceding discussion synchronization  between the receiver and received signal has been assumed. When a periodic transmission is sent the probe and information components are identical and no synchronization is necessary. 

E. Implementation 
The receiver processing for both communications systems was performed by small general purpose digital computers frequently called minicomputers. The M5 systems were implemented on a Digital Equipment Corporation LINC-8 computer with a 4,096-word (12 bits/word) memory. The M6 systems were implemented on a DEC PDP-8E system with an 8,192 word (12 bits/word) memory. 


CEL   Technical Memorandum No. 104
03604-1-M
OPERATOR'S MANUAL
for the
M4 COMMUNICATIONS EXPERIMENT
by
David Jaarsma
COOLEY ELECTRONICS LABORATORY
Department of Electrical Engineering
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Contract No. N00014-67-A-0181-0032
Office of Naval Research (Code 468)
Department of the Navy
Washington, D. C. 20360
August 1970

I. INTRODUCTION
The M4 Communication System is a complete revision of the
M3 Communication System as constructed by C.V. Kimball in
June 1969.

Some photos diagrams from the above work as to computer and system set up which is interesting to me as you can see a Receiving and a Hydrophone Line


Photos of computers below:
Receiving Hydrophone Line 100 Hz Bandpass Filter etc.

PDP-8 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

   DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION PDP 8/E 
FIELD-8 computer Field-8/E System 1 with what looks like a General Radio 1161-A Coherent Decade Frequency Synthesizer ontop of the FIELD-8 computer Field-8/E System 1







LINC-8 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


( Pictured ) The LINC-8 contained one PDP-8 CPU and one LINC  The LINC (Laboratory INstrument Computer)  CPU, partially emulated by the PDP-8 LINC-8 was the name of a minicomputer manufactured by Digital Equipment Corporation between 1966 and 1969. ( Pictured ) The Teletype Corporation ASR 33 Teletype 


The Digital Equipment Corporation DEC PDP-8e PDP-8m Small Computer Handbook with Digital Equipment Corporation, PDP-11 Processor Handbook
IV. Experimental Program
Five long-term experiments (M5A, M5B, M6A, M6B, and M6C) were performed between fixed sites in the Straits of Florida to evaluate the effectiveness of coherent integration/matched-filter techniques.

A. Differences Among Experiments
In each of the five experiments the transmission was generated by the source off Fowey Rocks Light. During the M5 experiment signals were received at a hydrophone located 7 nmi from the Fowey Rocks source while in the M6 experiment signals were received at the Bimini hydrophone 42 nmi from the source.

B. Experimental Results
The five experiments yielded data on both acoustic transmission conditions and system error performance. In this section only measurements that bear on the evaluation of system error performance or on future applications on the communication system are discussed. 


1. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Histograms
To interpret the communication performance data, an understanding of the signal and noise environment of each experiment is necessary.


2. Communication System Performance
Evaluation of communication system performance is a difficult problem when one is confronted with a varying conditions of the acoustic medium. 


3. Channel Stability Measurements
The utility of the match-filter technique studied here is highly dependent on the stability of the medium. If the acoustic channel changes significantly from the time of the probe measurement to the time of the information component processing then the filter will not be properly matched and an increase in errors can be expected. 

V. Spatial Stability Measurements
The preceding sections described the operation and performance of an underwater acoustic communication system operating between two fixed points. In a practical submarine communication system one or both ends of the acoustic channel is in motion so a spatial variations  as well as temporal variations are important. This sections describes two measurements of the spatial stability of the medium and provides the foundation for the extension of the fixed-site communication techniques previously discussed to the submarine communication problem. 


The fixed-site experiments have shown the temporal stability of the medium to be sufficient to allow integration times of the order of one minute. From a purely geometric point of view the medium should also be stable under spatial displacements that are common to submarine platforms. For example a submarine on a 10-knot zero Doppler track at a range of 100 nmi subtends less than 0.1 deg of arc in one minute. The wideband characteristics of the acoustic channel would not be expected to change significantly under such a displacement. Nevertheless careful measurements have been made to validate this intuitive understanding.


A. Coherent Cross Correlation without Coherent Integration
In this measurement technique the spatial stability of the medium was measured in terms of normalized correlation coefficients p1(i) analogous to the correlation coefficient p(k) studied in the M5 and M6 experiments. Because of the presence of the Doppler effect however the definition had to be modified slightly. The transmission was a 15-digit pseudorandom sequence similar to that of the M5A,M5B and M6A experiments. 




The preliminary spatial stability measurements were conducted with a towed HX90 source in the Straits of Florida during September 1973. Figure 14 depicts the vessel track during these experiments. The source was towed at approximately 200-ft depth with vessel speeds of 2.5, 5, and 10 knots. Signals from the source were received at a hydrophone approximately 7 mmi from the Fowey Rocks Light and were sent via cables to the laboratory on shore. 

B. Coherent Cross Correlation with Coherent Integration
After the preliminary spatial stability measurements in September 1973 development of a measurement technique including coherent ingrain was initiated. The requirement for coherent integration was based on two considerations. First the September 1973 experiments showed that noise and surface modulation precluded measurement of the spatial stability when no coherent integration was used and second an opportunity to study spatial stability at long ranges in the deep ocean was available. The input signal-to-noise ratio at these ranges required coherent integration to obtain adequate representation of the signal. The resulting measurement technique which employs coherent cross correlation with coherent integration is described below. Because of the need to perform coherent integration as well as to accommodate Doppler effects fast Fourier transform techniques (FFT) were employed.
1. Operation at Zero Doppler
To understand the operation of the operation of the measurement technique first consider its operation with zero Doppler. Because the transform interval contains nearly 22 sequence periods every 22nd transform spectral line from the carrier will contain signal energy. The intervening 21 transform lines will contain only noise energy. Consequently a processing gain of 22 (13.4 db) can be achieved by considering only every 22nd transform spectral line about the carrier. 

2. Operation with Nonzero Doppler
Measurement of the correlation coefficient p2(k) and the input and output signal-to-noise ratios is not significantly more difficult when the Doppler is nonzero. Let f be the Doppler-shifter carrier frequency

If the difference between f and the receiver center frequency f is small then the effect of Doppler on the received signal is approximately a frequency translation. Such a frequency translation acts as a fixed offset between the zero-Doppler location of the signal spectral lines and the actual received spectral lines.


3. Experimental Results
During January 1974 the HX90 acoustic source was towed in the deep ocean between Eleuthera and Bermuda. The approximate vessel track relative to the hydrophone is shown in Fig 18. Signals from the source were received at a fixed hydrophone and processed with the the coherent integration technique described above. The ranges of the experiment varied from 0 to 400 mmi with most of the experiment being conducted at ranges between 300 and 400 mmi. During the experiment the vessel speed was maintained at approximately 6 knots.

VI. Future Applications and Conclusions
The effectiveness of coherent matched-filter techniques was demonstrated in fixed-site experiments in the Straits of Florida. The application of coherent integration over time intervals of the order of one minute yield satisfactory operation at input signal-to-noise ratios below 0 db. By matched filtering of the received signal the effects of selective fading and intersymbol interference due to multipath were reduced. Massive amounts of data (over 4,000 hours) on system performance add significance to the results obtained. 

To apply coherent matched-filter techniques to the submarine communication problem an understanding of the medium’s spatial as well as temporal stability is required. A ten-day experiment in the Atlantic between Eleuthera and Bermuda with a towed source and a fixed hydrophone was conducted to measure spatial stability.The results from this experiment indicated the presence of sufficient spatial stability over intervals of at least 30 sec at six knots at ranges from 0 to 400 nmi.

The combination of fixed-site communication system results and the spatial stability measurements establishes the feasibility of coherent matched-filter techniques for submarine communications. Advantages to be gained from these techniques include reliable operation at low signal-to-noise ratios and under varying propagation conditions. Further randomized transmission formats can be employed to reduce the detectability of the communication signal. Because the technology required to implement coherent matched-filter techniques is readily available their application to submarine communications should be initiated. 


1. Subsidiary Conclusions
The experimental program yield several secondary results that should be considered in subsequent submarine communication system design.

First the acoustic medium exhibits significant variance in input signal-to-noise ratio SNR even under fixed-site conditions. Standard deviations of SNR of the order of 5 db can generally be expected. These variations require that any reliable communication system be able to operate successfully over a wide range of input signal-to-noise ratios. Coherent matched-filter systems satisfy this requirement more closely than the incoherent systems currently in use. 

Second impulsive noise must be accounted for in any system in which low PE 0.001 bit error probabilities are required. The presence of infrequent high-energy noise pulses can limit the error probability to a fixed level independent of the average input signal-to-noise ratio. Soft limiting of the receiver input in conjunction with error-correcting codes can be used to overcome this limitation. 


B. Suggested Application
The M5 and M6 communication systems were designed specifically for the evaluation of coherent matched-filter techniques. Consequently, their structures lack many features required of a practical submarine communication system. For example, the transmission in the M5 and M6 systems is continuous and synchronization is performed by the operator. Neither of these characteristics is acceptable in practice. The purpose of this section is to suggest one realization of a coherent, matched-filter  communications system that is suitable for operational use. Only the structure of the transmission and the expected performance characteristics are given here. The details of the receiver processing and implementation will be available in the future. 


The M7 system described below has been designed to provide an application of coherent matched-filter techniques that satisfy the requirements previously stated. Specifically the M7 system utilizes a burst type of transmission with a randomized format. The structure of the transmission is based entirely on an arbitrary random binary sequence that can be changed on a daily basis if desired. The only constraint on the sequence is that it must be know to both the transmitter and receiver and have the same statistical properties as other random sequences. 

In the M7 system the probe and information components are phase multiplexed instead of time multiplexed as in the M5 and M6 systems. Let a(t) be a low-pass digit of duration T and let f be the carrier frequency, then the M7 transmission is given by ____. 

The first term in the sum is the probe component and the second is the information component. The coefficients __ are derived from a random binary sequence q(i) and the information component as indicated below. 

Let __be a random binary sequence of length 2k The coefficients for the probe component qr(i) are simply the q(i)s of even index.


Assume that K information bits e(i) are to be transmitted. Further assume that Kb is a factor of Ki so that K=Kb Ks for some integer K Then the coefficients for the information component are given by

Since both coefficients q (i) and q (i)  are derived from a random sequence q(i) the transmission m(t) can be expected to be free from periodicities or strong spectral components. If the input signal-to-noise ratio of an intercept receiver is below 0 db the detectability of the M7 transmission will be very low. If the input signal-to-ratio of the intercept receiver is above 0 db conventional power measurements techniques are applicable. Consequently the M7 technique (and any other) can be considered detection resistant only if the intercept receiver in denied an adequate  signal-to-noise ratio that is beyond a certain range. 

To provide an illustration of the performance to be expected of the M7 system a specific practical example is given: Assume that the system bandwidth is 100 hz and that the transmission duration is limited to 40 sec. Let n(t) be 10-m sec rectangular pulse, so that the spectrum of the n(t) fills the system bandwidth. Then K, equals 4,000. Table 5 gives the system performance for several choices of K. The column marked “minimum operating SNR” gives the input signal-to-noise ratio expected to yield a bit probability of error of 0.001. This signal-to-noise ratio is obtained by taking the theoretical signal-to-noise ratio required to obtain such performance and then adding a +6 db differential to account for non-idealities. Note the low signal-to-noise ratios for which the 0.001 error probability is expected. 
-----------------------


Under Acknowledgements he mentions Navy CDR Don Koehler and company of the US Naval Facility Eleuthera during the January 1974 experiments.

Special appreciation is due to Dr. Chester A. Jacewitz, Mr. John J Shearer and Ms. Mary Forlenza for their contributions to the research program

And References 
1) C.V. Kimball Intersymbol interference in binary communication systems technical report 195 Cooley Electronics Laboratory University of Michigan August 1968
2) C.V. Kimball A MIMI Communication Experiment technical report 197 Cooley Electronics Laboratory University of Michigan 
3) David Jaarsma Experimental Research in Binary Communications using the Miami 42 mile Underwater Acoustic Channel technical report 207
4) John C. Steinberg and Ted G. Birdsall Underwater Sound Propagation in the Straits of Florida 1966.
* My father is mentioned in the piece of work under acknowledgments C.V. Kimball on the computer analysis techniques. 




Some of the Distribution List to my father’s  Acoustic Communication Studies (U) An experimental study of techniques for Submarine to Submarine Communications Systems. Contract Number N00014-73-C-0593. I would like to think that maybe his Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593 might have had the same Distribution List is in hopes that one of these other agencies within the The Department of The Navy might still have a copy. 

Advanced Research Projects Agency
1400 Wilson Blvd.
Arlington, Virginia 33309
Attn: Dr. John Richard Seesholtz
Dr. R Cook

Office of Naval Research (Code 222)
800 N. Quincy St.
Arlington, Virginia 22217
Att: Dr. Alan O. Sykes

Director
Naval Research Laboratory
Washington, D.C 20390
Att: Dr. William Hahn
Mr. Caldwell McCoy
Technical Information Division

Commander
Naval Ordnance Laboratory
Acoustics Division
White Oak, Silver Spring, Maryland 20907
Attn: Dr. Zaka Slawsky

Commander
Naval Undersea Center
San Diego, California 92132
Attn: Mr. Darrell Marsh
Dr. Harper Whitehouse

Commanding Officer & Director
Naval Underwater Systems Center
Fort Trumbull
New London, Connecticut 06321
Attn: Dr. Alan V. Ellinthorpe
Dr. Albert H Nuttall
Dr. Dan Viccione

Commander
Naval Air Development Center
Johnsville, Warminster, Pennsylvania 18974

Commanding Officer
Naval Ship Research & Development Center
Washington, D.C 20034

NISC Naval Intelligence Support Center
4301 Suitland Road
Washington, D.C. 20390
Attn : Johann Martinek
Mr. E. Bisset

Commander
Naval Ordnance Systems Command
Code ORD-03C
Navy Department
Washington, D.C. 20360

Commander
Naval Sea Systems Command
Washington, D.C 20360
Attn: Mr. Carey D. Smith
Mrs. Dolly Hoffman 

Commander
Naval Undersea Research & Development Center
3202 E Foothill Blvd.
Pasadena, California 91107

Naval Electronics Systems Command
Washington, D.C. 20360
Attn: Mr. M. Parker
Mr. I. Smitten

Naval Electronics Systems Command
Submarine Integration Divison 
PME 117-23
Washington, D.C. 20360
Attn: Mr. Weinberger

Chief of Naval Operations
801 N. Randolph Street
Arlington, Virginia 22203
Attn: Code OP-095C

Defense Documentation Center
Cameron Station
Alexandria, Virginia 22314

Dr. Harry Sonnemann
Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy
(Research & Development)
Room 4D745, Pentagon
Washington, DC 20350



UPDATE :
To me and my father's disappointment as we just learned from August 30th 2016 The Office of Naval Research FOIA office that ONR The Department of The Navy had destroyed my father's Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593. 

The next step being his (M7) Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593 Based on the results of the experimental program development of a practical submarine-to-submarine communication system using coherent matched filter techniques is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) incorporating a randomized burst-type transmission for detection resistance is suggested as a basis for future work. 

So why would ONR The Department of The Navy destroy an Invention as many years of work went into this ?  So in a letter from ONR FOIA dated August 30th 2016 According to our records the contract files destroyed on November 14, 1984 pursuant to the Department of the Navy Management Program Manual (SECNAV 5212.5B)

My father is in his 70’s now and it would be great if he is able to see his work again that he did for The Department of The Navy Office Of Naval Research in which was funded by ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency) Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

Defense Technical Information Center
Accession Number : ADC003594
Title :   Acoustic Communication Studies
Descriptive Note : Technical rept. Jul 1971-Jun 1974
Corporate Author : ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE MIAMI FL


Report Date : Sep 1975
Pagination or Media Count : 47
Abstract : An experimental study of techniques for submarine to submarine communication was conducted. Based on the results of the experimental program, a practical submarine to submarine communication system is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) is suggested as a basis for future work.

Descriptors :   *ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATIONS, *UNDERWATER COMMUNICATIONS, SECURE COMMUNICATIONS, SIGNAL PROCESSING, SIGNAL TO NOISE RATIO, SUBMARINES, TOWED BODIES, UNDERWATER TO UNDERWATER

Subject Categories : Acoustic Detection and Detectors
      Acoustics
      Non-radio Communications

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE



I had thought I had liked the above film about The 70 Years of Innovation: ONR (Office of Naval Research) Reaches a Milestone as Rear Adm. Mat Winter, Chief Of Naval Research and Dr. Lawrence Schuette director of the Office of Naval Research discusses in this youtube video But have changed my feelings about it after this. My own father had spent many years doing contract work for ONR. 65-79 minus his two years Active duty Army. But to me and my father's disappointment as we just leaned from today August 30th 2016 The Office of Naval Research FOIA office that ONR The Department of The Navy had destroyed my father's Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593. So why would ONR (Office of Naval Research) The Department of The Navy destroy an Invention as many years of work went into this ?  So in a letter from ONR FOIA dated August 30th 2016 According to our records the contract files destroyed on November 14, 1984 pursuant to the Department of the Navy Management Program Manual (SECNAV 5212.5B)

I personally in my opinion would not have enjoyed hearing this if I was one of those best and brightest scientist ever as mentioned in the ONR (Office of Naval Research) video The 70 Years of Innovation: ONR (Office of Naval Research) Reaches a Milestone after many years of time effort and hours put into contract work and or inventions just to have them sent you a letter reading According to our records the contract files destroyed on November 14, 1984 pursuant to the Department of the Navy Management Program Manual (SECNAV 5212.5B)

 So how could my first ONR FOIA request for N00014-73-C-0593 be found ? 
Is it because it was a Office of Naval Research Contract but it was funded by ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency) Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
  This was to be the next step in his of his Acoustic Communication Studies (U) An experimental study of techniques for Submarine to Submarine Communications Systems. Contract Number N00014-73-C-0593 as seen here: http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADC003594

The next step being his (M7) Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593 Based on the results of the experimental program development of a practical submarine-to-submarine communication system using coherent matched filter techniques is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) incorporating a randomized burst-type transmission for detection resistance is suggested as a basis for future work. 

Thomas Q Kimball then at home in 1971-1979 at 8441 SW 142nd Street Miami, Florida 33158 

Thomas Q Kimball with the SWSC Sheeler Winton Swim Club 1970's

WA8UNS Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut  was a member of  The Sheeler Winton Swim Club in Miami, Florida 1971-1979 As it was truly a great place to swim.


Many thanks to Jim Donovan CAPT USN (Ret) Director IUSSCAA and the group for allowing me to become a member of the IUSS CAESAR Alumni Association, Integrated Undersea Surveillance System Caesar Alumni Association.

The Third Battle Innovation in the U.S. Navy's Silent Cold War Struggle with Soviet Submarines By Owen R. Cole Jr. 


Please click here to see:

The US Naval Facility Eleuthera Bahamas is mentioned in The Third Battle Innovation in the U.S. Navy's Silent Cold War Struggle with Soviet Submarines


#WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield in #FairfieldCounty #FairfieldCountyCT #CT #Connecticut Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut is the monitor for my US Naval Facility Eleuthera Bahamas Facebook Group in which is a closed group. As I only approve people are former employees and their dependents family member I approve the request to join. I request if you would like to join please message me as when you where there and a photo if possible. 


The picture collection of US Naval Facility Eleuthera, Bahamas, NAVFAC Eleuthera 1970's Pictures taken by father while working for the Office Of Naval Research ONR.

Please see and read pages 90-97 of the Papers in Australian Maritime Affairs | Royal Australian Navy Papers in Australian Maritime Affairs No. 21. Australian Maritime Issues 2007 - SPC-A Annual






Nicely written as to my 8 1/2 years living in Miami, Florida between 1971-1979 before moving to Connecticut in 1979.

The below information is 


And
Please see pdf link on Using the Ocean to Hunt Soviet Submarines, 1950-1961 History – The American Sound Surveillance System: Using the Ocean to Hunt Soviet Submarines, 1950-1961 Volume 5 Number 2. The American Sound Surveillance System:  Gary E. Weir,. U.S. Naval Historical Center;
The below mentions two names of folks that my father had worked with from being a student of Theodore Birdsall, at Michigan’s Cooley Electronics Laboratory and with working with John Steinberg

Steinberg worked for seven years on Project Jezebel, the low frequency acoustic research that made the Sound Surveillance System [SOSUS] possible.

When he left Bell Labs for retirement and a research post at the University of Miami’s facility on Virginia Key between Miami and Key Biscayne, Steinberg’s interest in SOSUS continued.

University of Michigan mathematician then supported by ONR for his work in acoustic signal processing. Theodore Birdsall, at Michigan’s Cooley Electronics Laboratory

Contract Proposal PGI-MI-3 Period of Performance 1 July 1972- 30 June 1973

Transmission fluctuations John C. Steinberg, Office of Naval Research. Acoustics Programs, Institute for Acoustical Research

Institute for Acoustical Research, Miami Division of Palisades Geophysical Institute Blauvelt, New York 10913 , 1973

Institute for Acoustical Research, Miami Division of Palisades Geophysical Institute 615 S.W. 2nd Avenue Miami, Florida 33130 






A familiar name here is J. Lamar Worzel Vice President.

Worzel is a cofounder of the Palisades Geophysical Institute




Palisades Geophysical Institute, Inc Proposal PGI-MI-3 My father Dr. C.V. Kimball is listed with Dr. John C. Steinberg under Co-Principal Investigators 


Special Studies Group IAR/ PGI Suite 4 9719 South Dixie Highway Miami, Florida 33156 Special Studies Group IAR/PGI ( Institute for Acoustical Research. Miami Division of the Palisades Geophysical Institute. ) Suite 4 9719 South Dixie Highway Miami, Florida 33156

TI-MIX (Microcomputer Information Exchange) 

Tl-MIX (Texas Instruments Mini/MicrocomputerInformation Exchange)

TI-MIX (Texas Instruments Mini/Microcomputer Information Exchange) 


T-Building United States Naval Facility - Eleuthera, Bahamas

I am the site administrator for NAVFAC Eleuthera Bahamas Facebook Group, US Naval Facility Eleuthera Bahamas and the NAVFAC Bermuda Facebook Group, US Naval Facility Bermuda Facebook Group

US Naval Facility Eleuthera, Bahamas NAVFAC Eleuthera Patch. I found this among other items given to me in helping to clean out my parents house. My father use to do trips there alot when we lived in Miami, Fla 1971-1979 as he did work for the Office Of Naval Research ONR

United States Naval Facility - Eleuthera, Bahamas

A familiar name here is J. Lamar Worzel Vice President. and also mentioned  Dr. John C Steinberg I had begun doing my own naval historical research by connecting the names. And came up with William Maurice Ewing and his student John Lamar Worzel to John C. Steinberg and T.G. Birdsall


Meeting the Submarine Challenge: A Short History of the Naval Underwater Systems Center. U.S. Gov't. Print. Office, 1997. by John Merrill, Lionel D. Wyld. 


I had enjoyed wanting to help others out and I enjoyed watching Emergency Squad 51 as a kid so my father on a trip had picked up for me while he was doing some work with the Naval Underwater Systems Center New London Connecticut  for the Office of Naval Research some how was able to get for me the NUSC Naval Underwater Systems Center New London Connecticut Fire Department 



As a student of the Cooley Electronics Laboratory Department of Electrical Engineering The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan.

He was a student of Mr. T. G. Birdsall Professor Birdsall 
Please see Professor Emeritus Ted Birdsall Receives Silver Medal in Signal Processing in Acoustics Ted Birdsall - Silver Medal in Signal Processing in Acoustics

From the above website :
Professor Emeritus Theodore G. Birdsall was recently honored with the Silver Medal in Signal Processing in Acoustics by the Acoustical Society of America, "for contributions to signal detection theory and development of coded sequences in underwater acoustics." He is only the second recipient of this award

Theodore G. Birdsall  was a member of the Office of Naval Research's Underwater Sound Advisory group in 1966

During my father's time with the Cooley Electronics Laboratory Department of Electrical Engineering The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan. He was a contributor to many of the joint effort has been nicknamed MIMI (Miami-MIchigan )
hence the fact that I was born in 1969 at the The University of Michigan Hospital  Ann Arbor, Michigan. And moving to Miami in 1971. After my father's Army two-year active duty contract was over. 

Durring his time with the Cooley Electronics Laboratory Department of Electrical Engineering The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan. He was a contributor to many things like seen below.

Technical Report No. 161
03674-5-T
THEORY OF SIGNAL DETECTABILITY:
COMPOSITE DEFERRED DECISION THEORY
by
Richard A. Riberts
Approved by:B. F. Barton
for
COOLEY ELECTRONICS LABORATORY
Department of Electrical Engineering
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Contract No. Nonr-1224(36)
Office of Naval Research
Department of the Navy
Washington 25, D. C.
March 1965

the computer programs were written by Mr. Kimball. Mr. Kimball incorporated several special techniques in the computations due to the complicated functions that
arose in the analysis. The programs represent a great amount of very good work. Appendix C is due to Mr. Kimball.

Just by google searching Detection theory, or signal detection theory, and goto Detection theory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia you can see all the math involved.

As my interest in Amateur Radio Ham Radio and other  related things came from my father



Steinberg JC, Birdsall TG (1966) Underwater sound propagation in the Straits of Florida. J Acoust Soc Am 39: 301–315 * My father is mentioned in the piece of work under acknowledgments C. Kimball on the computer analysis techniques. 



Below is some of my fathers old work

Accession Number : AD0674423
Title :   INTERSYMBOL INTERFERENCE IN BINARY COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS.
Descriptive Note : Technical rept.,
Corporate Author : MICHIGAN UNIV ANN ARBOR COOLEY ELECTRONICS LAB
Personal Author(s) : Kimball,Christopher V.
Report Date : AUG 1968
Pagination or Media Count : 213
Abstract : When a binary communication system transmits symbols through a bandlimited channel, the received symbols will generally overlap in time, giving rise to intersymbol interference. In the presence of noise, intersymbol interference produces a significant increase in the system probability of error. The problem of intersymbol interference and noise is considered here for known, linear, time invariant channels and with added white Gaussian noise. Although a particular underwater acoustic channel is used as a source of motivation, the results presented are equally applicable to other communication channels. Traditional approaches to the intersymbol interference problem--spectrum and transversal (time) equalization are examined. A basis for the comparison of intersymbol interference problems using the concept of phase equalization, is given. A major assumption which limits the interference to that caused by adjacent symbols is made. This assumption is shown to be equivalent to restricting the transmitter to reasonable signalling rates relative to the bandwidth of the channel power spectrum. All subsequent analysis and evaluation are done under this assumption. Several linear filter receivers prevalent in the literature are reviewed and evaluated. Two easily implemented nonlinear receivers are considered as alternatives to the more complex optimized linear filter receivers. The iterated switched-mode receiver is shown to perform better than any optimized linear receiver when intersymbol interference is moderate. (Author)
Descriptors :   *UNDERWATER COMMUNICATIONS, INTERFERENCE, DIGITAL SYSTEMS, MULTIPATH TRANSMISSION, BANDWIDTH, ERRORS, PROBABILITY, INFORMATION THEORY.
Subject Categories : Cybernetics
      Non-radio Communications
Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE

In my father's phd publication Intersymbol Interference In Binary Communications by C.V. Kimball in which he mentions to things here in this blog posting: Iterated Switched-Mode Receiver in which the below shows his Patent US3611149 also mentioned in his Forward in his Intersymbol Interference In Binary Communications phd publication "This report considers a practical problem in underwater communications - intersymbol interference. And the above contributions should be of considerable importance to a designer of a underwater communications system." In which I am proud to show and share his Acoustic Communication Studies (U) An experimental study of techniques for Submarine to Submarine Communications Systems as seen above. 





I am sharing his work for educational purposes.
3611149 is referenced by 15 patents and cites 3 patents.

There is disclosed an iterated switched mode receiver which operates on a received distorted serial binary sequence to diminish or eliminate 
intersymbol interference. The operation of the receiver is predicated upon making two decisions on each symbol. The preliminary or 'first guess' decisions on adjacent symbols are used to eliminate the effects of these symbols on the final decision for each symbol. Signal delays are employed so that it is possible to work with the successor digit as well as the predecessor digit. The preliminary decisions on the succeeding and preceding digits are made by threshold circuit having thresholds at zero. The final decision is made by a variable threshold circuit which receives as its inputs outputs representative of the digit immediately preceding, the digit immediately succeeding and the digit to be processed.
Title
Application Number
04/830,964
Publication Number
3611149
Application Date
June 6, 1969
Publication Date
Inventor
Assignee
The Bottelle Development Corporation a correction would be Assignee is 
(The Battelle Development Corporation)
IPC

Notice the application date is 1969-06-06 which is about on month before I was born July 4th 1969


Amplitude Learning in the Sequential‐Clipper Crosscorrelator Detection Receiver By C.V. Kimball as seen on 70th Meeting Acoustical Society Of America Wednesday 3 November 1965
A comparison is made between an adaptive sequential‐clipper crosscorrelator and the adaptive nonclipping sequential receiver for the case of a signal known except for amplitude; i.e., amplitude is specified by a probability distribution. Both receivers update distributions on the signal amplitude during the observation process to learn the transmitted signal amplitude and, consequently, improve receiver performance. This study compares the amplitude learning of the two receivers during one step of the sequential procedure. Assuming the same initial information, a fixed small‐amplitude signal is applied to the input of each of the receivers and the distributions after observation are studied. From these distributions, the amplitude learning of the sequential‐clipper crosscorrelator receiver is compared with that of the amplitude‐utilizing receiver to provide a measure of the efficiency of the clipper crosscorrelator receiver in learning the signal amplitude. The measure obtained is analogous to the well‐known detection efficiency of 2/π. [Work supported by the U. S. Office of Naval Research Acoustics Programs (Code 468).]


J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Volume 38, Issue 5, pp. 911-911 (1965); (1 page)

Electrical Engineering Department, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 48105 

Acoutical Research Underwater
Underwater Acoustical Research Group ( an informal version of " Information Processing Group Cooley Electronics Research Laboratory" ) 






Finally after so many years of waiting for a National Security Agency NSA FOIA request to be approve  today April 5th 2014, I get to see my fathers paper in the NSA Technical Journal Article 1966 on 
C.V. Kimball A Text Recognition Procedure for Cryptanalysis.  https://www.nsa.gov/news-features/declassified-documents/tech-journals/assets/files/text-recognition.pdf As student University of Michigan.  Paper looks like to was viewed at the International Symposium in Information Theory at UCLA 31 January-2 February 1966 mentions Dr. B.C. Getchell, P1 My research on google mentions  Dr. B.C. Getchell  Butler University



If you look at last page of C.V. Kimball A Text Recognition Procedure for Cryptanalysis.  
Looking at the page of references. You see C.V. Kimball
A RecognitionProcedure for Natural-Language Text with Application to Cryptography,
Unpublished thesis University of Michigan 1965. And Communication Theory of Secrecy Systems is a paper published in 1949 by Claude Shannon  

references. Communication Theory of Secrecy Systems. (Shannon, C.E.) Bell System Technical Journal, 28: 4. October 1949 Pages 656 and Page 709


As my interest in Amateur Radio Ham Radio and other  related things came from my father

Please click here to see about

and
and


Wiley-IEEE Press: Claude E. Shannon: Collected Papers I would like to get a copy of this but cost to much.

Claude Shannon - Father of the Information Age 




And also Theory of signal detectability : composite deferred decision theory 1965 in which my father contribute to by The computer programs were written by Mr. Kimball incorporated several special techniques in the computations due to the complicated functions that
arose in the analysis. The programs represent a great amount of very good work. Appendix C is due to Mr. Kimball. As you interest is your his first son and also that a lot of this has to due in which we use communications in today’s world. 


Two old books of my father The Mathematical Theory Of Communications by Claude E. Shannon and Warren Weaver and Information Theory and Introduction For Scientists and Engineers Raisbeck 


Some of my father’s old books:
Key Papers in the Development of Coding Theory Elwyn R. Berlekamp IEEE Press

Spread Spectrum Techniques Robert C. Dixon IEEE Press

Data Communication Via Fading Channels Kenneth Brayer  IEEE Press

 Secret and Secure: Privacy, Cryptography, and Secure Communication by Clayton C. Pierce
 Analysis of the permutations in the federal data encryption Standard  Clayton C. Pierce
I am proud of my father’s work for Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) Office Of Naval Research ONR and US Army Signal Corps Officer with the US Army Security Agency Support Group The National Security Agency NSA as I was personal around for this from 1969-1979.  As Amateur Radio Ham Radio was in the family 60's-70's (WN8QGF 1965-1966)WA8UNS (1966-1971) -WB4WZR (1971 until recently changed) And my mother was WN8QGE 1965-1966. As with this my Amateur Radio Ham Radio FCC call sign is WA8UNS





I grew up with Drake Amateur Radio Equipment, R. L. Drake Company manufacturer of electronic communications and also KDK 2 meter FM transceiver mobile in the 1970's My father also used a  Vibroplex Bug.,

As WA8UNS was my father's call sign in which changed in 1971 with a 4 call. The Drake Amateur Radio Equipment was sold before we moved to Paris, France in 1984. From 1979-1984 I would be able to build some small kits from Heathkit like a Code Oscillator HD-1416 Morse Heathkit Brand, Heath Co.; Benton Harbor MI and a few others. 



My Fathers old vibroplex morse code keyer mid 60's-70's WN8QGF-WA8UNS ( 1965-1971 ) -WB4WZR ( 1971 until recently changed )


The little guy in the crib is Thomas Q Kimball

My father was in Signal Officer Basic Course, Ft Gordon June through August 1969 but came back to Ann Arbor, Michigan to see my birth July 4th 1969. Wish I could  see a class picture photo from the Signal Officer Basic Course, Ft Gordon June through August 1969 

I became interested in areas of subjects that where related to my growing up with my father's military past and also Amateur Radio Ham Radio as I was born in  July 1969 at the The University of Michigan Hospital  Ann Arbor, Michigan. So I was around for his Army two-year active duty which included US Army Signal Corps Officer with the US Army Security Agency Support Group out of Ft Meade, Md. We had a TDY at Ft Hood, TX December 1969 through May 1970 for MASSTER US Mobile Army Sensor System Test Evaluation and Review SurveillanceTarget Acquisition and Night Observation STANO As it reads from the website masster - 1969-1976 - OTC History

On October 17, 1969, Project MASSTER moved to Building 91025 at the newly designated West Fort Hood, formerly "Killeen Base."and also Ft Meade for the National Security Agency NSA R Group - Research and Engineering. May 1970-71 as a Cryptanalysis . After that we moved to Miami, Fla for the ONR Office Of Naval Research 71-79. The work for ONR Office of Naval Research took my father to US Naval Facility NAVFAC Eleuthera and NAVFAC Bermuda.


I did not know any of my father's work from 1969-1979.  And really didn't learn anything of it until mid to late 1980's.  But did find his old Vietnam Era OG-107 Uniforms in which I had found in box's and would wear the shirts when hiking.


#WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ThomasQuickKimball #ThomasKimball #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield @ridgefield in #FairfieldCounty #FairfieldCountyCT #CT #Connecticut Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut wanted to share :
An experiment study of coherent, matched filter techniques for  submarine-to-submarine communication was conducted, matched filter techniques offer three advantages over existing systems. First, coherent integration allows useful system operation at signal-to-noise ratios significantly below 0 db. Incoherent systems experience a threshold at a 0 db signal-to-noise ratio, which causes system performance to deteriorate rapidly. Second, filtering of the received information symbol with a filter matched to the received symbol waveform reduces the effects of both noise and multipath. Finally, these techniques are compatible with a wideband, randomized transmission format, which reduces the detectability of the signal by unintended receivers. The research program was conducted in two stages. The first stage evaluated communication system performance over 7- and 42- nmi fixed-site ranges. Over 4,000 hours of experimental data were obtained and analyzed to ensure the statistical significance of the measurements. Results from these data showed that reliable communication could be obtained with signal-to-noise ratios below 0 db. A typical experimental system (M6B) transmitted 0.625 bit/sec in a 100-hz band centered on 420 hz. Over a 42-nmi patch this system yielded a bit error probability of 0.01 at an input signal-to-noise ratio of -9 db. Such performance is within 6 db of that obtainable with the optimum receiver operating though a linear time invariant channel with added white Gaussian noise. To determine the applicability of the fixed-site results to the submarine-to-submarine communication problem the second stage of the program investigated the space-time stability of the acoustic medium with a towed source. An experiment was conducted in the deep ocean off Eleuthera, B.I at ranges from 0 to 400 nmi. This experiment indicated only a 10 percent decorrelation  in the channel from one 30-sec interval to the next. Consequently the coherent, matched filter techniques evaluated over the fixed-site ranges are applicable to practical problems involving moving platforms. Based on the results of the experimental program development of a practical submarine-to-submarine communication system using coherent matched filter techniques is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) incorporating a randomized burst-type transmission for detection resistance is suggested as a basis for future work. 

The next step being his (M7) Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593 Based on the results of the experimental program development of a practical submarine-to-submarine communication system using coherent matched filter techniques is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) incorporating a randomized burst-type transmission for detection resistance is suggested as a basis for future work. 

In which is my father’s Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593 which is listed also as a ONR contract number in ink and on the cover sheet of the Acoustic Communication Studies (U) An experimental study of techniques for Submarine to Submarine Communications Systems. 
Contract Number N00014-73-C-0593 Technical Report July 1971 June 1974  Report Date September 1975 ARPA Advanced Research Projects Agency Office Of Naval Research Code 222

Here in clear blank and white can see where is reads here : Since 1 July 1974 the research program described within has been continued at the University of Miami under contract N00014-75-C-0593 by the Office Of Naval Research The number N00014-75-C-0593 is also my father Christopher V Kimball Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593 
In which can be see here please look at 3 page. Full Text : http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADC003594


As can see above the Reply to me FOIA case number 16-F-1714 at was received 07 November 2016. Department of Defense Office Of Freedom of Information in the 3 paragraph is tell me that
" The technical report ADC003594 suggested a follow-on phase m(7) be explored as future work. The original contract number was ONR contract N00014-73-C-0434 but was continued under N00014-73-C-0593 with the University of Miami. "

You can see that the contract number wrong/incorrect and also there is proof it did continue as a Office Of Naval Research ONR contract number N00014-75-C-0593 which lead to my father's Office Of Naval Research ONR Contract N00014-75-C-0593 which is the same as the Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593. So in my impression by denying it exists and or was ever done is wrong.


The above is a In addition, I've found a formal transmission  letter of the document to the Office of Naval Research ONR Resident Representative, dated December 30 1975 

Mr. Edward P Shute Office of Naval Research ONR Resident Representative University of Florida Room 427, Eng & Ind. Bldg. Gainesville, Fla 32611 this letter was sent and included in my letter to the Department of Defense Office Of Freedom of Information. The above letter reads. 

University of Miami
Coral Gables Florida 33124
December 30, 1975

Mr. Edward P Shute 
ONR Resident Representative 
University of Florida Room 427, Eng & Ind. Bldg. 
Gainesville, Fla 32611

Dear Mr. Shute:

REFERENCE: Interim Invention Statement, US Navy N00014-75-C-0593 UM/A/C B8180, PI: Dr. C. Kimball

As requested in Mrs. Kalmus' phone call December 17th regarding subject contract, enclosed find 2 copies of Interim Invention Statement for the same, which has been completed for the University by the Principal Investigator and executed for the University by Mr. Howard R Cottrell, Treasurer. 




 So in a letter from ONR Office Of Naval Research  FOIA dated August 30th 2016 According to our records the contract files destroyed on November 14, 1984 pursuant to the Department of the Navy Management Program Manual (SECNAV 5212.5B)
I tried to google search the above: November 14, 1984 pursuant to the Department of the Navy Management Program Manual (SECNAV 5212.5B) and couldn't find anything also other in the ONR FOIA dated August 30th 2016 in what the ONR  Office Of Naval Research does with US Navy Interim Invention Statement such as my father's Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593.

As my father emails writes me:


Ms. Gay is/was at Office of Naval Research ONR 

Dear Ms. Gay,

I'm sorry you were able to locate the requested document.

In the meantime, I've been able to locate the full contract number for
the document; a number including a 'C': N00014-75-C-0593 .  In addition, I've found a formal transmission letter of the document to the ONR Resident Representative, dated December 30 1975 (attached).

(Mr. Edward P Shute  Office of Naval Research ONR Resident Representative University of Florida Room 427, Eng & Ind. Bldg. Gainesville, Fla 32611)

Please advise whether, with this new information, I should:

1. Contact the FOIA appeals office, or

2. Submit a new FOIA request to the Navy or ONR, or

3. Request a continuation from your office.

Two factors suggest that the document should exist somewhere.

1. It's a patent disclosure that might have had long term financial value to the Navy.

2. It's a classified document (Confidential) that couldn't be just thrown in a wastebasket.

At any rate, thanks for your assistance,


Yours,

My father is in his 70’s now and it would be great if he is able to see his work again that he did for The Department of The Navy Office Of Naval Research in which was funded by ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency) Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

Defense Technical Information Center
Accession Number : ADC003594
Title :   Acoustic Communication Studies
Descriptive Note : Technical rept. Jul 1971-Jun 1974
Corporate Author : ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE MIAMI FL


Report Date : Sep 1975
Pagination or Media Count : 47
Abstract : An experimental study of techniques for submarine to submarine communication was conducted. Based on the results of the experimental program, a practical submarine to submarine communication system is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) is suggested as a basis for future work.

Descriptors :   *ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATIONS, *UNDERWATER COMMUNICATIONS, SECURE COMMUNICATIONS, SIGNAL PROCESSING, SIGNAL TO NOISE RATIO, SUBMARINES, TOWED BODIES, UNDERWATER TO UNDERWATER


As I have written below I'm not sure how I feel about ONR Office of Naval Research video's below:




I had thought I had liked the above film about The 70 Years of Innovation: ONR (Office of Naval Research) Reaches a Milestone as Rear Adm. Mat Winter, Chief Of Naval Research and Dr. Lawrence Schuette director of the Office of Naval Research discusses in this youtube video But have changed my feelings about it after this. My own father had spent many years doing contract work for ONR. 65-79 minus his two years Active duty Army. But to me and my father's disappointment as we just leaned from today August 30th 2016 The Office of Naval Research FOIA office that ONR The Department of The Navy had destroyed my father's Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593. So why would ONR (Office of Naval Research) The Department of The Navy destroy an Invention as many years of work went into this ?  So in a letter from ONR FOIA dated August 30th 2016 According to our records the contract files destroyed on November 14, 1984 pursuant to the Department of the Navy Management Program Manual (SECNAV 5212.5B)

I personally in my opinion would not have enjoyed hearing this if I was one of those best and brightest scientist ever as mentioned in the ONR (Office of Naval Research) video The 70 Years of Innovation: ONR (Office of Naval Research) Reaches a Milestone after many years of time effort and hours put into contract work and or inventions just to have them sent you a letter reading According to our records the contract files destroyed on November 14, 1984 pursuant to the Department of the Navy Management Program Manual (SECNAV 5212.5B)

 So how could my first ONR FOIA request for N00014-73-C-0593 be found ? 
Is it because it was a Office of Naval Research Contract but it was funded by ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency) Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
  This was to be the next step in his of his Acoustic Communication Studies (U) An experimental study of techniques for Submarine to Submarine Communications Systems. Contract Number N00014-73-C-0593 as seen here: http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADC003594

The next step being his (M7) Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593 Based on the results of the experimental program development of a practical submarine-to-submarine communication system using coherent matched filter techniques is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) incorporating a randomized burst-type transmission for detection resistance is suggested as a basis for future work. 
#WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield @ridgefield  in #FairfieldCounty #CT  Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut wanted to share Some 42 years later I can now see and read some of my own father’s work. This took about 3 years from my first FOIA request 13-F-1279 On 20 August 2013 after spotting my father's work Kimball C.V. Acoustic Communication Studies on a online Journal of Defense Research Cumulative Index, 1969-1978. 


Then to ONR FOIA 16-061 received scanned pdf on July 20th 2016

Though I was a young boy at the time while we had lived in Miami, Florida from 1971-1979. Here is a piece of his work called 
Acoustic Communication Studies (U) An experimental study of techniques for Submarine to Submarine Communications Systems. 
Contract Number N00014-73-C-0593 Technical Report July 1971 June 1974  Report Date September 1975 ARPA Advanced Research Projects Agency Office Of Naval Research Code 222. Supplementary Notes: To be published in the Journal Of Defense Research Series B Tactical Warfare, September 1975 Performing Organization Ocean Engineering Division RSMAS Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science University Of Miami UM-RSMAS 75034 Palisades Geophysical Institute Miami Florida

By this above Table 1. Summary of fixed-site communications experiments. You can tell by Experiment M1 and appears year is 1968 my father had started working on this when still at Cooley Electronics Laboratory University of Michigan. The above in table finished with the Experiment M6C year 1973


The little guy in the crib is Thomas Q Kimball WA8UNS

My father was in Signal Officer Basic Course, Ft Gordon June through August 1969 but came back to Ann Arbor, Michigan to see my birth July 4th 1969. At the The University of Michigan Hospital  Ann Arbor, Michigan. From 1969 until 1971 my father had to do his Army two-year active duty US Army Signal Corps Officer with the US Army Security Agency Support Group out of Ft Meade, Md. We had a TDY at Ft Hood, TX  December 1969 through May 1970 for MASSTER US Army Project Mobile Army Sensor System Test Evaluation and Review Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Night Observation STANO. National Security Agency NSA R Group - Research and Engineering 1970-1971 after that in 1971 we would move to Miami, Florida. 



Thomas with his father somewhere in the Florida Everglades  Circa 1970’s after 1971.

My father who was WB4WZR in Miami then 1971-1979 And WA8UNS from 1966-1971
 Where it all started 69-71 Call sign WA8UNS at our home in Bowie, Md United States  Notice the HF Antenna in the back ground. 


Thomas Q Kimball WA8UNS from Ridgefield, Connecticut and my father Operating Special Station February 4th - 6th 2013

Father and son Operating Amateur Radio Ham Radio at AMC Appalachian Mountain Club Northwest Camp. northwest slope of Bear Mountain in Salisbury, CT.  My Mom did the role of professional Photographer. Thanks :)

I have taken time to re-write some of my father’s work below are samples and or parts of his work. Please note some of the mathematics might be off in my re-write as some of it hard to see. The complete work can be found here: http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADC003594 so it would be picked up by search engines such as google. I am sharing his work for educational purposes.




An experiment study of coherent, matched filter techniques for  submarine-to-submarine communication was conducted, matched filter techniques offer three advantages over existing systems. First, coherent integration allows useful system operation at signal-to-noise ratios significantly below 0 db. Incoherent systems experience a threshold at a 0 db signal-to-noise ratio, which causes system performance to deteriorate rapidly. Second, filtering of the received information symbol with a filter matched to the received symbol waveform reduces the effects of both noise and multipath. Finally, these techniques are compatible with a wideband, randomized transmission format, which reduces the detectability of the signal by unintended receivers. The research program was conducted in two stages. The first stage evaluated communication system performance over 7- and 42- nmi fixed-site ranges. Over 4,000 hours of experimental data were obtained and analyzed to ensure the statistical significance of the measurements. Results from these data showed that reliable communication could be obtained with signal-to-noise ratios below 0 db. A typical experimental system (M6B) transmitted 0.625 bit/sec in a 100-hz band centered on 420 hz. Over a 42-nmi patch this system yielded a bit error probability of 0.01 at an input signal-to-noise ratio of -9 db. Such performance is within 6 db of that obtainable with the optimum receiver operating though a linear time invariant channel with added white Gaussian noise. To determine the applicability of the fixed-site results to the submarine-to-submarine communication problem the second stage of the program investigated the space-time stability of the acoustic medium with a towed source. An experiment was conducted in the deep ocean off Eleuthera, B.I at ranges from 0 to 400 nmi. This experiment indicated only a 10 percent decorrelation  in the channel from one 30-sec interval to the next. Consequently the coherent, matched filter techniques evaluated over the fixed-site ranges are applicable to practical problems involving moving platforms. Based on the results of the experimental program development of a practical submarine-to-submarine communication system using coherent matched filter techniques is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) incorporating a randomized burst-type transmission for detection resistance is suggested as a basis for future work. 

1 Introduction:
Underwater acoustic communications systems based on coherent matched filter techniques have been studied coherent matched filter techniques have been studied experimentally. Although the specific goal of the research was tactical submarine to submarine communications systems, the results are applicable to other situations. This paper describes extensive fixed-site communication experiments and an important transmission measurements that encourage the immediate consideration of these techniques for submarine communication systems. 

Coherent, matched-filter techniques offer three distinct advantages for submarine communication systems. First coherent integration allows satisfactory operation at low signal-to-noise ratios without the threshold effect that is common to incoherent systems. Second, matched-filter operation reduces the effects of both noise and multipath under varying propagation conditions. And finally these techniques are compatible with a randomized transmission format that reduces the detectability of the communication signal. 

The processing techniques employed in the research are based on well established theory. The acoustic medium is measured to approximate a linear, time-invariant channel with added white Gaussian noise. For such a channel, the optimum receiver is composed of a filter matched to the received signal, following by the threshold device.The matched filter can also be shown to reduce intersymbol interference caused by multipath.

Because the physical channel is distinctly time-varying the received symbol waveform must be continually measured to maintain the required match between the filter and the symbol waveform. This measurement is made possibly including a known probe component in the transmission in addition to the unknown information component. Thurs the communication systems described here perform dual roles channel measurement and information transmission. 

The second stage of the experimental program was to determine the applicability if the fixed-site results to the submarine communication problem. For such an application to be possible, the acoustic medium must be stable in space as well as time. That is the probe measurement  of the channel must remain valid under spatial displacement of the submarine platform consequently a careful measurement of the spatial stability was made as described in Section V. 

The union of the results from the fixed-site communication experiments and the spatial-stability measurements solely indicates the feasibility of coherent matched-filter techniques for the submarine communication systems.This conclusions and others are presented in section VI. An application of these techniques in conjunction with a randomized transmission format is also given. 

II. Transmission  Format
Because of the dual nature of the transmission and the implementation of the receiver processing the signals transmitted by the communication systems have a complicated format. One part of the signal the probe component allows measurements of the channel the other the information component contains the information. Subsequent parts of this section describe these components in detail and explain there choose of transmission format. Section III on the receiver processing completes the explanation. The probe and information components are transmitted interleaved  in time (time multiplexed) as described in section IIb

A.  Basic Signal Element The Digit:
Both components of the transmission are composed of a succession of biphase modulated elements called digits The simplest example of a digit waveform is a rectangular carrier pulse.The probe and information components consist of modulated digits in a prescribed (or in the case of the information component almost prescribed) earlier. In the subsequent discussion no conflict will arise if the digit waveform is assumed to be a rectangular carrier pulse although in practice some amount of band spreading of the digit is desirable as suggested below. For a rectangular carrier pulse the pulse duration and bandwidth are inversely related: that is, once the duration is specified, the bandwidth is also fixed.


B. Probe Component
The probe component of the transmission allows the receiver to measure the channel digit response. Because the information symbols are composed of the combinations of the digits, a filter matched to the symbols can be formed from the digit response. The probe component must be constant and known to the receiver if this measurement is to be successful. 


C. Information Component
The information component can be formed in one of three ways: (1) biphase modulation of single transmitted digits: (2) biphase modulation of groups of digits, where the intragroup structure is constant: or (3) variable symbol modulation in which biphase modulation of groups of digits, where the intragroup structure varies from on symbol to the next is carried out. 

In the subsequent discussion, the difference between a digit-described previously-and a symbol is important. A symbol is a digit or groups of digits used to carry a single bit of information. The objective of the receiver is to determine symbol values, not digit values, thus the difference between the two methods of forming the information components lies in the structure of the symbol waveform. 

1. Single Digit Symbols 
The simplest construction of the information component assigns a single digit to each symbol. A digit transmitted at 0 phase represents a binary one; a digit transmitted at 180-deg phase represents a binary-minus one. This technique was used in the M1,M2, M3 and M4 systems. 

2. Multiple Digit Symbols
If each information symbol is composed of only one digit as described above then potential tradeoff opportunities for the system design are eliminated.


3. Variable Symbol Modulation
If more than one digit is contained in each symbol as described above, the opportunity to alter the symbol composition from one time interval to the next arises.

D. Multiplexing of Probe And Information Components
The transmission in each of the matched-filter communication systems consists of a multiplex of the probe and information components. In choosing the multiplexing technique the particular purpose of the probe component must be considered. For example frequency multiplexing would be inappropriate in the acoustic medium because the digit response measured in one frequency band would not be valid in another frequency band. 

III. Receiver Processing
The receiver in the M5 and M6 communication systems performs a dual role. The first part of this dual role is to measure the existing channel digit response from the probe component of the transmission. 




A. Preliminary Processing
Signals from the receiver hydrophone are transmitted though linear, fixed-gained amplifiers to the processor, the gains of these amplifiers being selected so that no clipping occurs during normal operations. 

B. Probe Processing
The primary objective of the probe processing is to determine the channel digit response. A secondary but important , objective of the probe processing is to measure the basic transmission characteristics of the medium to aid in evaluation and understanding of the system performance. 

1. Channel Digit Response Measurements
As mentioned above, the primary objective of the probe processing is to derive the approximate channel digit response p(t) Let p (k,i) be the sampled data representation of p(t) obtained in the kth measurement interval. 


2. Measurement of Signal and Noise Powers
The wideband signal and noise powers, SP and NP are measured to allow evaluation of the system performance.

C. Information Component Processing 
The objective of the information component processing is to make correct decisions on the transmitted symbol values. These decisions can be scored against known answers in the case of a periodic transmission. For demonstration purposes the received values can be printed as characters on a teletype. 

1. Matched-Filter Operation
The first step in the processing of the kth information component is to form a coherent average a,(k,i) of the information component:

2. Decision Process
To determine the symbol values a zero threshold is applied to the symbol matched-filter outputs L(k,i).

3. Scoring of Receiver Decisions
To evaluate the system error performance the receiver decisions d(i) are scored against know correct values. This can be done as long as the symbol values in the information component are known as they are in the case of periodic transmission.

D. Synchronization
In the preceding discussion synchronization  between the receiver and received signal has been assumed. When a periodic transmission is sent the probe and information components are identical and no synchronization is necessary. 

E. Implementation 
The receiver processing for both communications systems was performed by small general purpose digital computers frequently called minicomputers. The M5 systems were implemented on a Digital Equipment Corporation LINC-8 computer with a 4,096-word (12 bits/word) memory. The M6 systems were implemented on a DEC PDP-8E system with an 8,192 word (12 bits/word) memory. 


CEL   Technical Memorandum No. 104
03604-1-M
OPERATOR'S MANUAL
for the
M4 COMMUNICATIONS EXPERIMENT
by
David Jaarsma
COOLEY ELECTRONICS LABORATORY
Department of Electrical Engineering
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Contract No. N00014-67-A-0181-0032
Office of Naval Research (Code 468)
Department of the Navy
Washington, D. C. 20360
August 1970

I. INTRODUCTION
The M4 Communication System is a complete revision of the
M3 Communication System as constructed by C.V. Kimball in
June 1969.

Some photos diagrams from the above work as to computer and system set up which is interesting to me as you can see a Receiving and a Hydrophone Line


Photos of computers below:
Receiving Hydrophone Line 100 Hz Bandpass Filter etc.

PDP-8 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

   DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION PDP 8/E 
FIELD-8 computer Field-8/E System 1 with what looks like a General Radio 1161-A Coherent Decade Frequency Synthesizer ontop of the FIELD-8 computer Field-8/E System 1







LINC-8 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


( Pictured ) The LINC-8 contained one PDP-8 CPU and one LINC  The LINC (Laboratory INstrument Computer)  CPU, partially emulated by the PDP-8 LINC-8 was the name of a minicomputer manufactured by Digital Equipment Corporation between 1966 and 1969. ( Pictured ) The Teletype Corporation ASR 33 Teletype 


The Digital Equipment Corporation DEC PDP-8e PDP-8m Small Computer Handbook with Digital Equipment Corporation, PDP-11 Processor Handbook
IV. Experimental Program
Five long-term experiments (M5A, M5B, M6A, M6B, and M6C) were performed between fixed sites in the Straits of Florida to evaluate the effectiveness of coherent integration/matched-filter techniques.

A. Differences Among Experiments
In each of the five experiments the transmission was generated by the source off Fowey Rocks Light. During the M5 experiment signals were received at a hydrophone located 7 nmi from the Fowey Rocks source while in the M6 experiment signals were received at the Bimini hydrophone 42 nmi from the source.

B. Experimental Results
The five experiments yielded data on both acoustic transmission conditions and system error performance. In this section only measurements that bear on the evaluation of system error performance or on future applications on the communication system are discussed. 


1. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Histograms
To interpret the communication performance data, an understanding of the signal and noise environment of each experiment is necessary.


2. Communication System Performance
Evaluation of communication system performance is a difficult problem when one is confronted with a varying conditions of the acoustic medium. 


3. Channel Stability Measurements
The utility of the match-filter technique studied here is highly dependent on the stability of the medium. If the acoustic channel changes significantly from the time of the probe measurement to the time of the information component processing then the filter will not be properly matched and an increase in errors can be expected. 

V. Spatial Stability Measurements
The preceding sections described the operation and performance of an underwater acoustic communication system operating between two fixed points. In a practical submarine communication system one or both ends of the acoustic channel is in motion so a spatial variations  as well as temporal variations are important. This sections describes two measurements of the spatial stability of the medium and provides the foundation for the extension of the fixed-site communication techniques previously discussed to the submarine communication problem. 


The fixed-site experiments have shown the temporal stability of the medium to be sufficient to allow integration times of the order of one minute. From a purely geometric point of view the medium should also be stable under spatial displacements that are common to submarine platforms. For example a submarine on a 10-knot zero Doppler track at a range of 100 nmi subtends less than 0.1 deg of arc in one minute. The wideband characteristics of the acoustic channel would not be expected to change significantly under such a displacement. Nevertheless careful measurements have been made to validate this intuitive understanding.


A. Coherent Cross Correlation without Coherent Integration
In this measurement technique the spatial stability of the medium was measured in terms of normalized correlation coefficients p1(i) analogous to the correlation coefficient p(k) studied in the M5 and M6 experiments. Because of the presence of the Doppler effect however the definition had to be modified slightly. The transmission was a 15-digit pseudorandom sequence similar to that of the M5A,M5B and M6A experiments. 




The preliminary spatial stability measurements were conducted with a towed HX90 source in the Straits of Florida during September 1973. Figure 14 depicts the vessel track during these experiments. The source was towed at approximately 200-ft depth with vessel speeds of 2.5, 5, and 10 knots. Signals from the source were received at a hydrophone approximately 7 mmi from the Fowey Rocks Light and were sent via cables to the laboratory on shore. 

B. Coherent Cross Correlation with Coherent Integration
After the preliminary spatial stability measurements in September 1973 development of a measurement technique including coherent ingrain was initiated. The requirement for coherent integration was based on two considerations. First the September 1973 experiments showed that noise and surface modulation precluded measurement of the spatial stability when no coherent integration was used and second an opportunity to study spatial stability at long ranges in the deep ocean was available. The input signal-to-noise ratio at these ranges required coherent integration to obtain adequate representation of the signal. The resulting measurement technique which employs coherent cross correlation with coherent integration is described below. Because of the need to perform coherent integration as well as to accommodate Doppler effects fast Fourier transform techniques (FFT) were employed.
1. Operation at Zero Doppler
To understand the operation of the operation of the measurement technique first consider its operation with zero Doppler. Because the transform interval contains nearly 22 sequence periods every 22nd transform spectral line from the carrier will contain signal energy. The intervening 21 transform lines will contain only noise energy. Consequently a processing gain of 22 (13.4 db) can be achieved by considering only every 22nd transform spectral line about the carrier. 

2. Operation with Nonzero Doppler
Measurement of the correlation coefficient p2(k) and the input and output signal-to-noise ratios is not significantly more difficult when the Doppler is nonzero. Let f be the Doppler-shifter carrier frequency

If the difference between f and the receiver center frequency f is small then the effect of Doppler on the received signal is approximately a frequency translation. Such a frequency translation acts as a fixed offset between the zero-Doppler location of the signal spectral lines and the actual received spectral lines.


3. Experimental Results
During January 1974 the HX90 acoustic source was towed in the deep ocean between Eleuthera and Bermuda. The approximate vessel track relative to the hydrophone is shown in Fig 18. Signals from the source were received at a fixed hydrophone and processed with the the coherent integration technique described above. The ranges of the experiment varied from 0 to 400 mmi with most of the experiment being conducted at ranges between 300 and 400 mmi. During the experiment the vessel speed was maintained at approximately 6 knots.

VI. Future Applications and Conclusions
The effectiveness of coherent matched-filter techniques was demonstrated in fixed-site experiments in the Straits of Florida. The application of coherent integration over time intervals of the order of one minute yield satisfactory operation at input signal-to-noise ratios below 0 db. By matched filtering of the received signal the effects of selective fading and intersymbol interference due to multipath were reduced. Massive amounts of data (over 4,000 hours) on system performance add significance to the results obtained. 

To apply coherent matched-filter techniques to the submarine communication problem an understanding of the medium’s spatial as well as temporal stability is required. A ten-day experiment in the Atlantic between Eleuthera and Bermuda with a towed source and a fixed hydrophone was conducted to measure spatial stability.The results from this experiment indicated the presence of sufficient spatial stability over intervals of at least 30 sec at six knots at ranges from 0 to 400 nmi.

The combination of fixed-site communication system results and the spatial stability measurements establishes the feasibility of coherent matched-filter techniques for submarine communications. Advantages to be gained from these techniques include reliable operation at low signal-to-noise ratios and under varying propagation conditions. Further randomized transmission formats can be employed to reduce the detectability of the communication signal. Because the technology required to implement coherent matched-filter techniques is readily available their application to submarine communications should be initiated. 


1. Subsidiary Conclusions
The experimental program yield several secondary results that should be considered in subsequent submarine communication system design.

First the acoustic medium exhibits significant variance in input signal-to-noise ratio SNR even under fixed-site conditions. Standard deviations of SNR of the order of 5 db can generally be expected. These variations require that any reliable communication system be able to operate successfully over a wide range of input signal-to-noise ratios. Coherent matched-filter systems satisfy this requirement more closely than the incoherent systems currently in use. 

Second impulsive noise must be accounted for in any system in which low PE 0.001 bit error probabilities are required. The presence of infrequent high-energy noise pulses can limit the error probability to a fixed level independent of the average input signal-to-noise ratio. Soft limiting of the receiver input in conjunction with error-correcting codes can be used to overcome this limitation. 


B. Suggested Application
The M5 and M6 communication systems were designed specifically for the evaluation of coherent matched-filter techniques. Consequently, their structures lack many features required of a practical submarine communication system. For example, the transmission in the M5 and M6 systems is continuous and synchronization is performed by the operator. Neither of these characteristics is acceptable in practice. The purpose of this section is to suggest one realization of a coherent, matched-filter  communications system that is suitable for operational use. Only the structure of the transmission and the expected performance characteristics are given here. The details of the receiver processing and implementation will be available in the future. 


The M7 system described below has been designed to provide an application of coherent matched-filter techniques that satisfy the requirements previously stated. Specifically the M7 system utilizes a burst type of transmission with a randomized format. The structure of the transmission is based entirely on an arbitrary random binary sequence that can be changed on a daily basis if desired. The only constraint on the sequence is that it must be know to both the transmitter and receiver and have the same statistical properties as other random sequences. 

In the M7 system the probe and information components are phase multiplexed instead of time multiplexed as in the M5 and M6 systems. Let a(t) be a low-pass digit of duration T and let f be the carrier frequency, then the M7 transmission is given by ____. 

The first term in the sum is the probe component and the second is the information component. The coefficients __ are derived from a random binary sequence q(i) and the information component as indicated below. 

Let __be a random binary sequence of length 2k The coefficients for the probe component qr(i) are simply the q(i)s of even index.


Assume that K information bits e(i) are to be transmitted. Further assume that Kb is a factor of Ki so that K=Kb Ks for some integer K Then the coefficients for the information component are given by

Since both coefficients q (i) and q (i)  are derived from a random sequence q(i) the transmission m(t) can be expected to be free from periodicities or strong spectral components. If the input signal-to-noise ratio of an intercept receiver is below 0 db the detectability of the M7 transmission will be very low. If the input signal-to-ratio of the intercept receiver is above 0 db conventional power measurements techniques are applicable. Consequently the M7 technique (and any other) can be considered detection resistant only if the intercept receiver in denied an adequate  signal-to-noise ratio that is beyond a certain range. 

To provide an illustration of the performance to be expected of the M7 system a specific practical example is given: Assume that the system bandwidth is 100 hz and that the transmission duration is limited to 40 sec. Let n(t) be 10-m sec rectangular pulse, so that the spectrum of the n(t) fills the system bandwidth. Then K, equals 4,000. Table 5 gives the system performance for several choices of K. The column marked “minimum operating SNR” gives the input signal-to-noise ratio expected to yield a bit probability of error of 0.001. This signal-to-noise ratio is obtained by taking the theoretical signal-to-noise ratio required to obtain such performance and then adding a +6 db differential to account for non-idealities. Note the low signal-to-noise ratios for which the 0.001 error probability is expected. 
-----------------------


Under Acknowledgements he mentions Navy CDR Don Koehler and company of the US Naval Facility Eleuthera during the January 1974 experiments.

Special appreciation is due to Dr. Chester A. Jacewitz, Mr. John J Shearer and Ms. Mary Forlenza for their contributions to the research program

And References 
1) C.V. Kimball Intersymbol interference in binary communication systems technical report 195 Cooley Electronics Laboratory University of Michigan August 1968
2) C.V. Kimball A MIMI Communication Experiment technical report 197 Cooley Electronics Laboratory University of Michigan 
3) David Jaarsma Experimental Research in Binary Communications using the Miami 42 mile Underwater Acoustic Channel technical report 207
4) John C. Steinberg and Ted G. Birdsall Underwater Sound Propagation in the Straits of Florida 1966.
* My father is mentioned in the piece of work under acknowledgments C.V. Kimball on the computer analysis techniques. 




Some of the Distribution List to my father’s  Acoustic Communication Studies (U) An experimental study of techniques for Submarine to Submarine Communications Systems. Contract Number N00014-73-C-0593. I would like to think that maybe his Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593 might have had the same Distribution List is in hopes that one of these other agencies within the The Department of The Navy might still have a copy. 

Advanced Research Projects Agency
1400 Wilson Blvd.
Arlington, Virginia 33309
Attn: Dr. John Richard Seesholtz
Dr. R Cook

Office of Naval Research (Code 222)
800 N. Quincy St.
Arlington, Virginia 22217
Att: Dr. Alan O. Sykes

Director
Naval Research Laboratory
Washington, D.C 20390
Att: Dr. William Hahn
Mr. Caldwell McCoy
Technical Information Division

Commander
Naval Ordnance Laboratory
Acoustics Division
White Oak, Silver Spring, Maryland 20907
Attn: Dr. Zaka Slawsky

Commander
Naval Undersea Center
San Diego, California 92132
Attn: Mr. Darrell Marsh
Dr. Harper Whitehouse

Commanding Officer & Director
Naval Underwater Systems Center
Fort Trumbull
New London, Connecticut 06321
Attn: Dr. Alan V. Ellinthorpe
Dr. Albert H Nuttall
Dr. Dan Viccione

Commander
Naval Air Development Center
Johnsville, Warminster, Pennsylvania 18974

Commanding Officer
Naval Ship Research & Development Center
Washington, D.C 20034

NISC Naval Intelligence Support Center
4301 Suitland Road
Washington, D.C. 20390
Attn : Johann Martinek
Mr. E. Bisset

Commander
Naval Ordnance Systems Command
Code ORD-03C
Navy Department
Washington, D.C. 20360

Commander
Naval Sea Systems Command
Washington, D.C 20360
Attn: Mr. Carey D. Smith
Mrs. Dolly Hoffman 

Commander
Naval Undersea Research & Development Center
3202 E Foothill Blvd.
Pasadena, California 91107

Naval Electronics Systems Command
Washington, D.C. 20360
Attn: Mr. M. Parker
Mr. I. Smitten

Naval Electronics Systems Command
Submarine Integration Divison 
PME 117-23
Washington, D.C. 20360
Attn: Mr. Weinberger

Chief of Naval Operations
801 N. Randolph Street
Arlington, Virginia 22203
Attn: Code OP-095C

Defense Documentation Center
Cameron Station
Alexandria, Virginia 22314

Dr. Harry Sonnemann
Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy
(Research & Development)
Room 4D745, Pentagon
Washington, DC 20350



UPDATE :
To me and my father's disappointment as we just learned from August 30th 2016 The Office of Naval Research FOIA office that ONR The Department of The Navy had destroyed my father's Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593. 

The next step being his (M7) Interim Invention Statement US Navy N00014-75-C-0593 Based on the results of the experimental program development of a practical submarine-to-submarine communication system using coherent matched filter techniques is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) incorporating a randomized burst-type transmission for detection resistance is suggested as a basis for future work. 

So why would ONR The Department of The Navy destroy an Invention as many years of work went into this ?  So in a letter from ONR FOIA dated August 30th 2016 According to our records the contract files destroyed on November 14, 1984 pursuant to the Department of the Navy Management Program Manual (SECNAV 5212.5B)

My father is in his 70’s now and it would be great if he is able to see his work again that he did for The Department of The Navy Office Of Naval Research in which was funded by ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency) Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)

Defense Technical Information Center
Accession Number : ADC003594
Title :   Acoustic Communication Studies
Descriptive Note : Technical rept. Jul 1971-Jun 1974
Corporate Author : ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE MIAMI FL


Report Date : Sep 1975
Pagination or Media Count : 47
Abstract : An experimental study of techniques for submarine to submarine communication was conducted. Based on the results of the experimental program, a practical submarine to submarine communication system is proposed. A particular implementation (M7) is suggested as a basis for future work.

Descriptors :   *ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATIONS, *UNDERWATER COMMUNICATIONS, SECURE COMMUNICATIONS, SIGNAL PROCESSING, SIGNAL TO NOISE RATIO, SUBMARINES, TOWED BODIES, UNDERWATER TO UNDERWATER

Subject Categories : Acoustic Detection and Detectors
      Acoustics
      Non-radio Communications

Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE


Thomas Q Kimball then at home in 1971-1979 at 8441 SW 142nd Street Miami, Florida 33158 

Thomas Q Kimball with the SWSC Sheeler Winton Swim Club 1970's

WA8UNS Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut  was a member of  The Sheeler Winton Swim Club in Miami, Florida 1971-1979 As it was truly a great place to swim.


Many thanks to Jim Donovan CAPT USN (Ret) Director IUSSCAA and the group for allowing me to become a member of the IUSS CAESAR Alumni Association, Integrated Undersea Surveillance System Caesar Alumni Association.

The Third Battle Innovation in the U.S. Navy's Silent Cold War Struggle with Soviet Submarines By Owen R. Cole Jr. 


Please click here to see:

The US Naval Facility Eleuthera Bahamas is mentioned in The Third Battle Innovation in the U.S. Navy's Silent Cold War Struggle with Soviet Submarines


#WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield in #FairfieldCounty #FairfieldCountyCT #CT #Connecticut Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut is the monitor for my US Naval Facility Eleuthera Bahamas Facebook Group in which is a closed group. As I only approve people are former employees and their dependents family member I approve the request to join. I request if you would like to join please message me as when you where there and a photo if possible. 


The picture collection of US Naval Facility Eleuthera, Bahamas, NAVFAC Eleuthera 1970's Pictures taken by father while working for the Office Of Naval Research ONR.

Please see and read pages 90-97 of the Papers in Australian Maritime Affairs | Royal Australian Navy Papers in Australian Maritime Affairs No. 21. Australian Maritime Issues 2007 - SPC-A Annual






Nicely written as to my 8 1/2 years living in Miami, Florida between 1971-1979 before moving to Connecticut in 1979.

The below information is 


And
Please see pdf link on Using the Ocean to Hunt Soviet Submarines, 1950-1961 History – The American Sound Surveillance System: Using the Ocean to Hunt Soviet Submarines, 1950-1961 Volume 5 Number 2. The American Sound Surveillance System:  Gary E. Weir,. U.S. Naval Historical Center;
The below mentions two names of folks that my father had worked with from being a student of Theodore Birdsall, at Michigan’s Cooley Electronics Laboratory and with working with John Steinberg

Steinberg worked for seven years on Project Jezebel, the low frequency acoustic research that made the Sound Surveillance System [SOSUS] possible.

When he left Bell Labs for retirement and a research post at the University of Miami’s facility on Virginia Key between Miami and Key Biscayne, Steinberg’s interest in SOSUS continued.

University of Michigan mathematician then supported by ONR for his work in acoustic signal processing. Theodore Birdsall, at Michigan’s Cooley Electronics Laboratory

Contract Proposal PGI-MI-3 Period of Performance 1 July 1972- 30 June 1973

Transmission fluctuations John C. Steinberg, Office of Naval Research. Acoustics Programs, Institute for Acoustical Research

Institute for Acoustical Research, Miami Division of Palisades Geophysical Institute Blauvelt, New York 10913 , 1973

Institute for Acoustical Research, Miami Division of Palisades Geophysical Institute 615 S.W. 2nd Avenue Miami, Florida 33130 






A familiar name here is J. Lamar Worzel Vice President.

Worzel is a cofounder of the Palisades Geophysical Institute




Palisades Geophysical Institute, Inc Proposal PGI-MI-3 My father Dr. C.V. Kimball is listed with Dr. John C. Steinberg under Co-Principal Investigators 


Special Studies Group IAR/ PGI Suite 4 9719 South Dixie Highway Miami, Florida 33156 Special Studies Group IAR/PGI ( Institute for Acoustical Research. Miami Division of the Palisades Geophysical Institute. ) Suite 4 9719 South Dixie Highway Miami, Florida 33156

TI-MIX (Microcomputer Information Exchange) 

Tl-MIX (Texas Instruments Mini/MicrocomputerInformation Exchange)

TI-MIX (Texas Instruments Mini/Microcomputer Information Exchange) 


#WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ThomasQuickKimball #ThomasKimball #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield @ridgefield in #FairfieldCounty #FairfieldCountyCT #CT #Connecticut Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut wanted to share The T-Building United States Naval Facility - Eleuthera, Bahamas

I am the site administrator for NAVFAC Eleuthera Bahamas Facebook Group, US Naval Facility Eleuthera Bahamas and the NAVFAC Bermuda Facebook Group, US Naval Facility Bermuda Facebook Group

US Naval Facility Eleuthera, Bahamas NAVFAC Eleuthera Patch. I found this among other items given to me in helping to clean out my parents house. My father use to do trips there alot when we lived in Miami, Fla 1971-1979 as he did work for the Office Of Naval Research ONR

#WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ThomasQuickKimball #ThomasKimball #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield @ridgefield in #FairfieldCounty #FairfieldCountyCT #CT #Connecticut Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut The United States Naval Facility - Eleuthera, Bahamas

#WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ThomasQuickKimball #ThomasKimball #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield @ridgefield in #FairfieldCounty #FairfieldCountyCT #CT #Connecticut Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut The United States Naval Facility - Eleuthera, Bahamas
 #WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ThomasQuickKimball #ThomasKimball #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield @ridgefield in #FairfieldCounty #FairfieldCountyCT #CT #Connecticut Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut The United States Naval Facility - Eleuthera, Bahamas
 #WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ThomasQuickKimball #ThomasKimball #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield @ridgefield in #FairfieldCounty #FairfieldCountyCT #CT #Connecticut Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut The United States Naval Facility - Eleuthera, Bahamas

A familiar name here is J. Lamar Worzel Vice President. and also mentioned  Dr. John C Steinberg I had begun doing my own naval historical research by connecting the names. And came up with William Maurice Ewing and his student John Lamar Worzel to John C. Steinberg and T.G. Birdsall


Meeting the Submarine Challenge: A Short History of the Naval Underwater Systems Center. U.S. Gov't. Print. Office, 1997. by John Merrill, Lionel D. Wyld. 


I had enjoyed wanting to help others out and I enjoyed watching Emergency Squad 51 as a kid so my father on a trip had picked up for me while he was doing some work with the Naval Underwater Systems Center New London Connecticut  for the Office of Naval Research some how was able to get for me the NUSC Naval Underwater Systems Center New London Connecticut Fire Department 



As a student of the Cooley Electronics Laboratory Department of Electrical Engineering The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan.

He was a student of Mr. T. G. Birdsall Professor Birdsall 
Please see Professor Emeritus Ted Birdsall Receives Silver Medal in Signal Processing in Acoustics Ted Birdsall - Silver Medal in Signal Processing in Acoustics

From the above website :
Professor Emeritus Theodore G. Birdsall was recently honored with the Silver Medal in Signal Processing in Acoustics by the Acoustical Society of America, "for contributions to signal detection theory and development of coded sequences in underwater acoustics." He is only the second recipient of this award

Theodore G. Birdsall  was a member of the Office of Naval Research's Underwater Sound Advisory group in 1966

During my father's time with the Cooley Electronics Laboratory Department of Electrical Engineering The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan. He was a contributor to many of the joint effort has been nicknamed MIMI (Miami-MIchigan )
hence the fact that I was born in 1969 at the The University of Michigan Hospital  Ann Arbor, Michigan. And moving to Miami in 1971. After my father's Army two-year active duty contract was over. 

Durring his time with the Cooley Electronics Laboratory Department of Electrical Engineering The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan. He was a contributor to many things like seen below.

Technical Report No. 161
03674-5-T
THEORY OF SIGNAL DETECTABILITY:
COMPOSITE DEFERRED DECISION THEORY
by
Richard A. Riberts
Approved by:B. F. Barton
for
COOLEY ELECTRONICS LABORATORY
Department of Electrical Engineering
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Contract No. Nonr-1224(36)
Office of Naval Research
Department of the Navy
Washington 25, D. C.
March 1965

the computer programs were written by Mr. Kimball. Mr. Kimball incorporated several special techniques in the computations due to the complicated functions that
arose in the analysis. The programs represent a great amount of very good work. Appendix C is due to Mr. Kimball.

Just by google searching Detection theory, or signal detection theory, and goto Detection theory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia you can see all the math involved.

As my interest in Amateur Radio Ham Radio and other  related things came from my father



Steinberg JC, Birdsall TG (1966) Underwater sound propagation in the Straits of Florida. J Acoust Soc Am 39: 301–315 * My father is mentioned in the piece of work under acknowledgments C. Kimball on the computer analysis techniques. 



Below is some of my fathers old work

Accession Number : AD0674423
Title :   INTERSYMBOL INTERFERENCE IN BINARY COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS.
Descriptive Note : Technical rept.,
Corporate Author : MICHIGAN UNIV ANN ARBOR COOLEY ELECTRONICS LAB
Personal Author(s) : Kimball,Christopher V.
Report Date : AUG 1968
Pagination or Media Count : 213
Abstract : When a binary communication system transmits symbols through a bandlimited channel, the received symbols will generally overlap in time, giving rise to intersymbol interference. In the presence of noise, intersymbol interference produces a significant increase in the system probability of error. The problem of intersymbol interference and noise is considered here for known, linear, time invariant channels and with added white Gaussian noise. Although a particular underwater acoustic channel is used as a source of motivation, the results presented are equally applicable to other communication channels. Traditional approaches to the intersymbol interference problem--spectrum and transversal (time) equalization are examined. A basis for the comparison of intersymbol interference problems using the concept of phase equalization, is given. A major assumption which limits the interference to that caused by adjacent symbols is made. This assumption is shown to be equivalent to restricting the transmitter to reasonable signalling rates relative to the bandwidth of the channel power spectrum. All subsequent analysis and evaluation are done under this assumption. Several linear filter receivers prevalent in the literature are reviewed and evaluated. Two easily implemented nonlinear receivers are considered as alternatives to the more complex optimized linear filter receivers. The iterated switched-mode receiver is shown to perform better than any optimized linear receiver when intersymbol interference is moderate. (Author)
Descriptors :   *UNDERWATER COMMUNICATIONS, INTERFERENCE, DIGITAL SYSTEMS, MULTIPATH TRANSMISSION, BANDWIDTH, ERRORS, PROBABILITY, INFORMATION THEORY.
Subject Categories : Cybernetics
      Non-radio Communications
Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE

In my father's phd publication Intersymbol Interference In Binary Communications by C.V. Kimball in which he mentions to things here in this blog posting: Iterated Switched-Mode Receiver in which the below shows his Patent US3611149 also mentioned in his Forward in his Intersymbol Interference In Binary Communications phd publication "This report considers a practical problem in underwater communications - intersymbol interference. And the above contributions should be of considerable importance to a designer of a underwater communications system." In which I am proud to show and share his Acoustic Communication Studies (U) An experimental study of techniques for Submarine to Submarine Communications Systems as seen above. 





I am sharing his work for educational purposes.
3611149 is referenced by 15 patents and cites 3 patents.

There is disclosed an iterated switched mode receiver which operates on a received distorted serial binary sequence to diminish or eliminate 
intersymbol interference. The operation of the receiver is predicated upon making two decisions on each symbol. The preliminary or 'first guess' decisions on adjacent symbols are used to eliminate the effects of these symbols on the final decision for each symbol. Signal delays are employed so that it is possible to work with the successor digit as well as the predecessor digit. The preliminary decisions on the succeeding and preceding digits are made by threshold circuit having thresholds at zero. The final decision is made by a variable threshold circuit which receives as its inputs outputs representative of the digit immediately preceding, the digit immediately succeeding and the digit to be processed.
Title
Application Number
04/830,964
Publication Number
3611149
Application Date
June 6, 1969
Publication Date
Inventor
Assignee
The Bottelle Development Corporation a correction would be Assignee is 
(The Battelle Development Corporation)
IPC

Notice the application date is 1969-06-06 which is about on month before I was born July 4th 1969


Amplitude Learning in the Sequential‐Clipper Crosscorrelator Detection Receiver By C.V. Kimball as seen on 70th Meeting Acoustical Society Of America Wednesday 3 November 1965
A comparison is made between an adaptive sequential‐clipper crosscorrelator and the adaptive nonclipping sequential receiver for the case of a signal known except for amplitude; i.e., amplitude is specified by a probability distribution. Both receivers update distributions on the signal amplitude during the observation process to learn the transmitted signal amplitude and, consequently, improve receiver performance. This study compares the amplitude learning of the two receivers during one step of the sequential procedure. Assuming the same initial information, a fixed small‐amplitude signal is applied to the input of each of the receivers and the distributions after observation are studied. From these distributions, the amplitude learning of the sequential‐clipper crosscorrelator receiver is compared with that of the amplitude‐utilizing receiver to provide a measure of the efficiency of the clipper crosscorrelator receiver in learning the signal amplitude. The measure obtained is analogous to the well‐known detection efficiency of 2/π. [Work supported by the U. S. Office of Naval Research Acoustics Programs (Code 468).]


J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Volume 38, Issue 5, pp. 911-911 (1965); (1 page)

Electrical Engineering Department, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 48105 

Acoutical Research Underwater
Underwater Acoustical Research Group ( an informal version of " Information Processing Group Cooley Electronics Research Laboratory" ) 






Finally after so many years of waiting for a National Security Agency NSA FOIA request to be approve  today April 5th 2014, I get to see my fathers paper in the NSA Technical Journal Article 1966 on 
C.V. Kimball A Text Recognition Procedure for Cryptanalysis.  https://www.nsa.gov/news-features/declassified-documents/tech-journals/assets/files/text-recognition.pdf As student University of Michigan.  Paper looks like to was viewed at the International Symposium in Information Theory at UCLA 31 January-2 February 1966 mentions Dr. B.C. Getchell, P1 My research on google mentions  Dr. B.C. Getchell  Butler University



If you look at last page of C.V. Kimball A Text Recognition Procedure for Cryptanalysis.  
Looking at the page of references. You see C.V. Kimball
A RecognitionProcedure for Natural-Language Text with Application to Cryptography,
Unpublished thesis University of Michigan 1965. And Communication Theory of Secrecy Systems is a paper published in 1949 by Claude Shannon  

references. Communication Theory of Secrecy Systems. (Shannon, C.E.) Bell System Technical Journal, 28: 4. October 1949 Pages 656 and Page 709


As my interest in Amateur Radio Ham Radio and other  related things came from my father

Please click here to see about

and
and


Wiley-IEEE Press: Claude E. Shannon: Collected Papers I would like to get a copy of this but cost to much.

Claude Shannon - Father of the Information Age 




And also Theory of signal detectability : composite deferred decision theory 1965 in which my father contribute to by The computer programs were written by Mr. Kimball incorporated several special techniques in the computations due to the complicated functions that
arose in the analysis. The programs represent a great amount of very good work. Appendix C is due to Mr. Kimball. As you interest is your his first son and also that a lot of this has to due in which we use communications in today’s world. 


Two old books of my father The Mathematical Theory Of Communications by Claude E. Shannon and Warren Weaver and Information Theory and Introduction For Scientists and Engineers Raisbeck 


Some of my father’s old books:
Key Papers in the Development of Coding Theory Elwyn R. Berlekamp IEEE Press

Spread Spectrum Techniques Robert C. Dixon IEEE Press

Data Communication Via Fading Channels Kenneth Brayer  IEEE Press

 Secret and Secure: Privacy, Cryptography, and Secure Communication by Clayton C. Pierce
 Analysis of the permutations in the federal data encryption Standard  Clayton C. Pierce
I am proud of my father’s work for Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) Office Of Naval Research ONR and US Army Signal Corps Officer with the US Army Security Agency Support Group The National Security Agency NSA as I was personal around for this from 1969-1979.  As Amateur Radio Ham Radio was in the family 60's-70's (WN8QGF 1965-1966)WA8UNS (1966-1971) -WB4WZR (1971 until recently changed) And my mother was WN8QGE 1965-1966. As with this my Amateur Radio Ham Radio FCC call sign is WA8UNS





I grew up with Drake Amateur Radio Equipment, R. L. Drake Company manufacturer of electronic communications and also KDK 2 meter FM transceiver mobile in the 1970's My father also used a  Vibroplex Bug.,

As WA8UNS was my father's call sign in which changed in 1971 with a 4 call. The Drake Amateur Radio Equipment was sold before we moved to Paris, France in 1984. From 1979-1984 I would be able to build some small kits from Heathkit like a Code Oscillator HD-1416 Morse Heathkit Brand, Heath Co.; Benton Harbor MI and a few others. 



My Fathers old vibroplex morse code keyer mid 60's-70's WN8QGF-WA8UNS ( 1965-1971 ) -WB4WZR ( 1971 until recently changed )


I am also a Army and Navy Brat as my father was a US Army Signal Corps Officer with the US Army Security Agency Support Group out of Ft Meade, Md. We had a TDY at Ft Hood, TX  December 1969 through May 1970 for MASSTER US Army Project Mobile Army Sensor System Test Evaluation and Review Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Night Observation STANO.  On October 17, 1969, Project MASSTER moved to Building 91025 at the newly designated West Fort Hood, formerly "Killeen Base.”

I believe after some research that Colonel Sammy J. Cannon, SigC was one of my father’s bosses at US Army Project Mobile Army Sensor System Test Evaluation and Review Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Night Observation STANO

Major General John K. Singlaub was the chief of staff, Project MASSTER US Mobile Army Sensor System Test Evaluation and Review Surveillance, Fort Hood, Texas, Oct 69 - Jun 71. 


Major General John K. Singlaub chief of staff, Project MASSTER, Fort Hood,



Many thanks to Major General John K. Singlaub for having sent this autographed picture to me. It really means a lot to me. As I was at home while my father was working under you there at US Army Project MASSTER US Army Project Mobile Army Sensor System Test Evaluation And Review STANO Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Night Observation. I believe my father was with the Communications/Navigation Branch As he was a US Army Signal Corps Officer with the US Army Security Agency Support Group
December 1969 through May 1970 apart of military history to me. Wish I could meet you in person one day and shake your hand. Thank You for your service


I had one day in the early 1990's like 1990 found this book on Major General John Kirk Singlaub Major General John Kirk Singlaub Hazardous Duty An American Soldier In The Twentieth Century  I look in it at the index and photos and came across Project MASSTER. So it became an intresting read to me. 


As my interest in my father’s military past grew as I was around for most of it July 1969-1979 10 years I wanted so research why his first activity duty TDY at Ft Hood, TX  December 1969 through May 1970 for MASSTER US Mobile Army Sensor System Test Evaluation and Review SurveillanceTarget Acquisition and Night Observation STANO. In which Major General John Singlaub was the chief of staff, Project MASSTER, Fort Hood, Texas, Oct 69 - Jun 71. ? As my father prior to this was doing mostly for the Office Of Naval Research ONR Cooley Electronics Laboratory Department of Electrical Engineering The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan. So a few years of researching came up with US Army Security Agency Support Group had a presence there but also maybe the part of SurveillanceTarget Acquisition and Night Observation STANO. Had some involvement with Operation Igloo White Sensors and Weapons which has mentioned U.S. Navy's Project Jezebel  replacing the hydrophones with microphones. But all is just a research theory for me. A book that caught my interest is Wiring Vietnam: The Electronic Wall - Anthony J. Tambini, Wiring Vietnam The Electronic Wall.pdf - Higher Intellect | Conte

Please click HERE THE FIELD ARTILLERYMAN - Fort Sill - U.S. Army  to see Sensor Systems Studied in Project MASSTER




Then we went back to Ft Meade for the National Security Agency NSA  May 1970-71 as a Cryptanalysis 



Some good reading

Attack on the USS Liberty by William D. Gerhard  Gerhard, William D. Attack on the USS Liberty: An Edited Version of SRH-256. Walnut Creek, CA: Aegean Park, 1996.

Secret and Urgent: The Story of Codes and Ciphers. 
Fletcher Pratt. Aegean Park Press, Apr 1, 1996 

The Origin and Development of the National Security Agency (Cryptographic Series) [ George Brownell, Wayne G. Barker] ( Laguna Hills, CA: Aegean Park Press, 1981)


The Origin and Development of the Army Security Agency 1917-1947. Laguna Hills, CA: Aegean Park Press, June 1, 1993



Movie from Top secret NSA by Discovery Channel 4 5 

  



My old 1980's passport DDR Deutsche Demokratische Republik  East Germany from 1986 Zarrentin to Staaken, Again when the familiy was pulled over didn't know anything about my father's military past.,, 


US Army Security Agency Support Group Fort George G Meade Maryland 
Awards and Decorations Ceremony Service Club #2 1400 Hours 30 September 1970






Thomas Q Kimball WA8UNS visiting the NSA National Cryptologic Museum - NSA/CSS The Memorial Wall  "They Served in Silence,"2006


National Cryptologic Memorial - NSA/CSS - National Security Agency






The little guy in the crib is Thomas Q Kimball

My father was in Signal Officer Basic Course, Ft Gordon June through August 1969 but came back to Ann Arbor, Michigan to see my birth July 4th 1969. Wish I could  see a class picture photo from the Signal Officer Basic Course, Ft Gordon June through August 1969 

I became interested in areas of subjects that where related to my growing up with my father's military past and also Amateur Radio Ham Radio as I was born in  July 1969 at the The University of Michigan Hospital  Ann Arbor, Michigan. So I was around for his Army two-year active duty which included US Army Signal Corps Officer with the US Army Security Agency Support Group out of Ft Meade, Md. We had a TDY at Ft Hood, TX December 1969 through May 1970 for MASSTER US Mobile Army Sensor System Test Evaluation and Review SurveillanceTarget Acquisition and Night Observation STANO As it reads from the website masster - 1969-1976 - OTC History

On October 17, 1969, Project MASSTER moved to Building 91025 at the newly designated West Fort Hood, formerly "Killeen Base."and also Ft Meade for the National Security Agency NSA R Group - Research and Engineering. May 1970-71 as a Cryptanalysis . After that we moved to Miami, Fla for the ONR Office Of Naval Research 71-79. The work for ONR Office of Naval Research took my father to US Naval Facility NAVFAC Eleuthera and NAVFAC Bermuda.


I did not know any of my father's work from 1969-1979.  And really didn't learn anything of it until mid to late 1980's.  But did find his old Vietnam Era OG-107 Uniforms in which I had found in box's and would wear the shirts when hiking.


#WA8UNS @WA8UNS #ridgefieldct #Ridgefield in #FairfieldCounty #CT  Thomas Q Kimball of Ridgefield, Connecticut  wanted to share :

Questions I have seen on google.

How did September 11th change my life.  How has your life changed since 9/11? How did the attacks of 9/11 change your life?

#NeverForget911

Since The activation Task Force Liberty, the New York Guard Component of the 42nd Joint Task Force Rainbow Hope activated for Operation World Trade Center. And leaving with New York Guard with Honorable Discharge July 31 2003. In some of the training I have received from people that where there at Ground Zero WTC on 9/11 in which an honor to be taught by them. I’m glad to have made these accomplishments in my training which has been continuous, as it’s always evolving in Emergency Management. Some of my training might follow some of the recommendations from the 


“Create dedicated, ongoing training programs for FDNY chiefs so that they are proficient in using ICS principles during large and complex incidents involving terrorism, chemical, biological and radiological materials, and attacks to critical infrastructure.”

 Thomas Q Kimball WA8UNS with The New York Guard State Volunteer Force At Camp Smith Training Site HHC, Army Division Enlisted in the New York Guard 29 April 2000 ETS April 2003  Promoted Staff Sergeant E-6 15 March 2003 Honorable Discharge July 31 2003 Rank Grade SSG/E6 NYG World Trade Center Incident
#nyguard #newyorkguard #campsmith @newyorkguard

 A Certificate of Special Recognition The New York Guard Operation World Trade Center at Camp Smith Training Site apart of The New York Guard  MP Detachment 



I had just found this below in a storage
42nd Joint Task Force Rainbow Hope

Joint Task Force 42 Rainbow Hope

An Open Letter to JTF 42 Service Members Brigadier General Joseph J Taluto Joint Task Force Commander

Synopsis of NYG ARDIV Duty Assignments, Task Force New York City and Task Force Liberty, 9/11/01 to 1/10/02 as seen in The Guardian Issue # 02-1 June 2002

At the time of The New York Guard activation Task Force Liberty, the New York Guard Component of the 42nd Joint Task Force Rainbow Hope activated for Operation World Trade Center. At Camp Smith Training Site we were at Threatcon Charlie FPCON CHARLIE  apart of The New York Guard  MP Detachment we where unarmed while working there at Camp Smith Training Site  Cortlandt Manor near Peekskill, NY, New York Guard Awards and Decorations include: New York State Defense of Liberty Medal 15 September 2002, as well as the New York Guard Commander’s Citation 15 August 2002



From my old historical file:  Military Police Unit Headquarters 
New York Guard Army Division
Camp Smith
Newsletter
29 June 00

Under #6 Training A self study book is a available to all MP’s on responding to terrorism. 

The book FEMA/USFA/NFA-ERT:SS June 1999
Emergency Response To Terrorism Self-Study U.S Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs-Bureau of Justice Assistance Federal Emergency Management Agency United States Fire Administration-National Fire Academy



As seen in Fire Engineering: first responders' first line of defense in terrorism responses by Sam Hansen and Alan Veasey. This article mentions how The federal Emergency Response to Terrorism Job Aid, which is intended to be used with the Department of Transportation (DOT) Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG)

Please click here to see 

Please click here to see 

Please click here to see 

Please click here to see 
Please see link below to read article written by Kenneth O. Burris Jr. as appeared in Fire Engineering 10/01/2000

Please see link below:



From my old historical file:  Military Police Unit Headquarters 
New York Guard Army Division
Camp Smith
Newsletter

1 April 00

Under #5 Training Up date on Peace Officer Training, will be held at Camp Smith on 29 & 30 April, 6 May, 20 & 21 May.


Thomas with the two New York Guard Peace Officer Training Instructors.


New York Guard State Volunteer Force At Camp Smith Training Site Building 504 Peace Officer Training Group Photo. The training was April 29th and 30th and May 6th, 20th and 21st 2000 Thomas is in photo last row on the side of entry to building. Also in photo back row is friend Paul Garre also from Connecticut.


Then it was a must to get and have for the class and or course was the Penal Law and Criminal Procedure Law of the State of New York. For the New York Guard for the Peace Officer Training for the Military Police Unit Headquarters New York Guard.



From my old historical file:
NYSG-COS (3025) Members Of The New York Guard
World Trade Center (9*11) Survey
Operation Trade Center and Operation Airport Security Member Survey-State of New York

The New York Guard MP Detachment  Securing Camp Smith Training Site Pre New York Army National Guard MP Shack at Camp Smith Training Site Cortlandt Manor near Peekskill, NY, after 9/11 WTC Incident






Night time operations The New York Guard MP Detachment  Securing Camp Smith Training Site at Camp Smith Training Site Cortlandt Manor near Peekskill, NY, after 9/11 WTC Incident


In photo with New York State Police trooper Kevin Reppenhagen Camp Smith Training Site Cortlandt Manor near Peekskill, NY, after 9/11 WTC Incident


The New York Guard Military Police Station Provost Marshal Building 85 Camp Smith Training Site Cortlandt Manor near Peekskill, NY,  after 9/11 WTC Incident


The New York Guard Military Police Vehicle Camp Smith Training Site Cortlandt Manor near Peekskill, NY,  after 9/11 WTC Incident


New York Guard State Volunteer Force At Camp Smith Training Site NYG World Trade Center Incident Duty Group Photo. 

A small group of The New York Guard MP Detachment was sent to due some NYG World Trade Center Incident Duty at the New York Army National Guard and the Westchester County Police Academy in Valhalla, NY